How to Quit Your Job

Posted on Mar 10, 2010 | 187 comments


quit jobFile this under entrepreneurial advice

I know that this will sound like a random post topic for startup advice but I promise it’s relevant.  You actually need to give advice to nearly every employee whom you offer a job to on how to best quit their job.  This is important to improve conversion rates of accepted offers / joiners, shorten the time-to-join ratio and the improve the ability of that employee to maintaing good relations with their former employer.

When I started blogging I had an idea.  I would take all of the one-on-one conversations that I have with entrepreneurs from the things I’ve learned and just write them up for anybody to read.  This is advice that I end up giving ALL THE TIME and every CEO of a company I’m involved with will have heard this from me. (also, please remember my disclaimer – I’m not a lawyer)

You just made an offer to a new employee to join your company.  It might be a VP of Sales, Marketing or Technology.  Or it may just be a junior programmer, sales rep or accountant.  The reality is the same.  In a startup you want them to join immediately.  Tomorrow if possible.

Yet they of course need to serve notice.  There is always some version of the following scenario:

- they’ve worked at their employer for 3-4 years

- they really like their boss

- they don’t want to leave on bad terms

- their boss asks them to just work 4-6 weeks so he / she isn’t left in a bad position

- better yet, they’ve said,  ”help me understand what we could improve so you’d be happier staying”

Should you just let them deal with this themselves? No, of course not!  You’re an entrepreneur – you’re allowed to be a bit of a control freak.  I leave nothing to chance.  Left to their own devices most employees will muck up their exit.  Why?  They quit jobs very seldom (hopefully, otherwise, please reconsider whether you really want to hire them.  Job hoppers NEVER make good employees.  Kind of obvious even though many people overlook this).  Yet if your company is growing you deal with people quitting their employers to join you all the time.  So you have more experience in helping to manage the process.

I operate on the principle that you’re most vulnerable in any deal immediately after you’ve won.  I believe the same is true in recruiting.  So your goal is to get the employee working in your company as quickly as possible and with the least amount of collateral damage.

How do you deal with the time pressure issues? Sales people are normally tossed out the door when they quit their jobs.  So that one is usually easiest.  But for all other roles it can be tough.  Employees who are about to join you get “guilted” into sticking around longer than is necessary.  My argument to the incoming employee was always, “look, BigCo is never really going to miss you materially once you’re gone – it just feels like that.  They’re going to pressure you into staying longer than you should. Don’t.  Trust me, if they were doing layoffs they wouldn’t keep you an extra month just to be nice.  They key is to be very professional and courteous on the way out.  Then you’ll be fine.  And we really, really need you in two weeks so please do your best not to get suckered into extra time.”

I had a tactic of writing out the line of reasoning for the employee so they knew what to say. The follow are the employees talking points

- I’ve been offered a role in a new startup that is an exciting new opportunity for me. It’s a lot of responsibility and has fantastic upside.  I’m really excited.

- So unfortunately I’m going to turn in my notice

- They’re pressuring me to start next week (this is called “anchoring” (setting short time frames)) but I obviously told them that it would be unfair to give you less than 2 weeks’ notice. So I just want to confirm with you that you want me to stay the full two weeks ( a “presumptive close” (which makes it sound like, “of course this is the normal sequence of events. I’m just confirming what I’m sure you’ll agree.))

Employer: “Gosh, this is a really crucial time. I really need you to stay for 4-6 weeks if we’re to hit our deadlines.” (invariably this is always their position).

- I understand why you’d feel that way and I’d love to help. But it’s super important to me that I don’t lose this opportunity and I’m 100% sure I’m going to eventually join. So I’d really like to work with you to minimize any pain for you. I can take those two weeks (again, anchoring and presumtive close) and really do a thorough transition to anybody you’d like. I’m happy to put in evenings and weekends to make this transition smooth. Please let me know how to best help. I know that my new company is being unfair in asking for a week so I’ve pushed for a full two weeks.

Me to future employee, “I know that they’re going to put the pressure on. You need to be resolute. Professional, polite, helpful and hard-working. But resolute. They’re going to try and get you to work longer. They might even try to convince you to stay. In reality they’ll get over your leaving. But we REALLY need you now.”

Why am I such a control freak about this? Noting good has ever come out of a potential employee staying longer at their previous company.  It’s more time that they can be flipped into staying.  They’re always guilted into staying longer than they should.  In this scenario – I lose.  Thus, I try to leave nothing to chance.

How should they talk to their boss about why they’re leaving?  The most common mistakes people make is telling their employer why they were unhappy.  This accomplishes nothing.

Only two outcomes – 1) they’re bitter about the things you told them needed to improve.  Let’s face it – they’ll never improve.  And they’ll invent that history that you were the bad guy for complaining.  Seem it happen – I promise.  No matter how hard they push in the exit interview don’t offer up the dirt.

2) They use what you’re unhappy about as a means to convince you to stay.  ”Oh, you didn’t have enough leadership opportunities?  We’ll put you in charge of this 10-person tech department.  I always remind employees, “if they really cared about your progression they would have done that proactively.  If they’re doing it now it’s only because they feel they have a gun to their head.  If you weren’t happy before this superficial change is only window dressing. They’re just rolling out the red carpet for you when you’re on the way out the door. If they were like this before what are they going to be like for the next few years of your job.

So my script for employees is to say, “I’m leaving for personal reasons.  I loved my time at YourCo.  I learned so much.  I grew.  I build fantastic friends and I’ll always be part of the alumni club.  But it was just time for me to move on to another opportunity.  It wasn’t YourCo.  It was me.  I was ready for the change.”  My main message is to:

- say you’re leaving for “personal reasons” and no matter how hard you’re pressed don’t give in and expound.  It’s just personal reasons.  Nobody can argue with this.  Nobody can offer you a better role to improve “personal reasons”- when asked what this really means just avoid answering.  ”You know, I was really happy here.  I just have some personal reasons why it’s time for a change.  NewCo seems like a great opportunity for me.”

Summary Recruiting is a very time-consuming and expensive exercise.  Most people put in herculean efforts into the process until the time of the offer being accepted.  And then they leave the rest to fate.  You enter a risky period after they’ve accepted.  You need to get them in your doors as quickly as possible.  There’s nothing worse than losing an employee that said yes but never joined.

One last hack For executive-level hires I like to get a press release written and work with the incoming employee on the wording and importantly timing of the release.  I like to discuss with them a timeline for announcement for 2 reasons: 1) it starts to build in emotional commitment and 2) you get a chance to test their resolve to joining.  You can always tell the person that is not persuaded when they’re not engaged in the press release process.  If they’re not engaged you can: 1) spend more effort making sure they’re bought in or 2) keep more back-up candidates warm.

UPDATE: Thanks to a well placed question by Jason Wolfe, I’ve added some comments below about the UK, Germany and France and how those employment situations differ.  I know that in the entertainment industry in the US things work differently (long term contracts).  If anybody has any experiences on foreign employment issues or US issues in entertainment or otherwise please feel free to add in the comments.

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    Alex, you're entitled to your point of view. I don't agree with it. All situations are negotiable. If you have a 2 months' notice period and your employer won't be reasonable about your leaving early – so be it. I'm not against that. But if you think that it's not worth trying to get out earlier, we'll just have to agree to disagree. It has nothing at all to do with honor.

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    I lived in France for 2.5 years. I took many holidays there even after I moved to the UK. I'm a big fan of France. Just not their employment laws.

    BTW, as an aside. I was fortunate enough to meet the French finance minister in 2001 after the 35 hour / week law was passed restricting employees to working no more than 35 hours (total lunacy). He said the following, which I'll always remember, “I love the 35 hour work week. I love it a lot. I love the 35 hour work week so much that I work two of them every week!” I knew exactly the predicament he was in. I laughed heartily.

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    Dan, it is semantics. I suspect if you ever heard me give the speech verbally you'd realize that I never overstep the boundaries. I tell them that this is my suggestion and I try to be helpful. But in the end it's your career and you need to do what you feel comfortable with. Please just promise me you won't give in just for the sake of giving in if you feel “guilted” into staying for an unnecessarily long time.

  • http://yorkstreetproperties.com/ Lance Puig

    This is so true. I'd rather hire employees who have a record of staying in a company for more than 2 years. And that's why I offer a competitive package to my employees, and when I see my employees staying for more than 6 months, I make sure all the more that they are better taken care of.

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    I think you're taking my words a bit further than I had intended them to. I try to offer a line of negotiation since I have to deal with this issue more than most people who quit their jobs very seldom. That's all. It's not manipulation – it's negotiation. And I'm just arming them with sound talking points. In the end it's up to them to put the words in their own tone.

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    I think that's a stretch, Ken. Just because an employers wants you to join sooner doesn't mean that they're immoral and not willing to be open when your mom dies. That's a slippery slope argument. I don't buy it.

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    Agree completely. I have only ever “saved” somebody once. And I didn't regret it. Generally I advise against it.

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    I stand by my statement. That doesn't mean there aren't valid reasons people changed jobs – as you say, “bought out, shut down, laid off” and even made some moves. But I think you know what I'm talking about. The person who's had 7 jobs in 12 years. When you interview them and ask why they changed jobs they often answer, “I got headhunted” or “I was offered more money.” In these instances, there is only one valid response, “hasta la vista, baby.”

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    Great input, Boris. I appreciate it. All correct.

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    BigCo is fine if they have subsequently worked at a startup. Plus, for some roles (like developers) it can be fine straight away. Depends. I prefer people with some startup experience, though.

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    Yeah, usually in this case people respect the employee. Harder when you want to leave to go to another job!

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    You probably do a good job anywhere. But for a startup I prefer not to waste cycles on people who I think are looking to leave. There's too many other talented people out there. BTW, 4 years isn't job hopping. My definition is people who change jobs every 2 years. There are many of these.

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    I disagree. Hiring job hoppers at startups is a non starter. Full stop. Definition – somebody who's average tenure is 2 years at most jobs. 4 years isn't “hopping.” 3 depends.

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    This might be true with you personally but not my experience. Many people feel guilty leaving and would rather stay longer than cause waves.

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    Agree entirely. And I don't think that your previous points are a million miles from my points of view. Thanks for contributing.

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    I want to write this. I have it on my list. It's such a sensitive topic that I've been resisting but I promise to cover it some day. I get lots of unpleasant input when I say things that upset people and I know that this topic will be a landmine. Maybe I'll save it for a week when I'm feeling like I have particularly thick skin ;-)

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    Awesome. And stay tuned for Launchpad announcements soon!

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    Ha. Yes, I plan to do a whole series on my experiences in Europe. Maybe later in the year. I have lots of stories / experiences to share.

  • Rhatta

    Only one point where we disagree: I've had 8 jobs in 12 years with an average tenure of less than 2 years. 3 of those companies had “.com” in their name circa 1998-2000 and no longer exist. I should get a pass on those. 1 management change that involved moving the company headquarters from SF to NJ. 1 recalled transfer to London where I chose to stay, and 1 necessitated by my move back to the US 2 years later. Only 2 instances where I actually sought and found a new opportunity while currently employed – I give no extra credit to people who go down with a sinking ship.

    I might be an exceptional case of either bad luck, bad decisions or both. I suspect that your response will be that there are exceptions to every rule (though I saw a “full stop” in one of your comments) and that I might be one. But I know lots of talented and dedicated young entrepreneurs whose formative professional years have been book-ended by 9/11 and 2009. And if they were doing anything interesting, it was high risk. Not exactly smooth sailing conditions…

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    OK, fair enough. I DO give a carve out for 1997-2001. And if there was some degree of high change for a while I can live with it if it's balanced with 1-2 placed where they were for 5-6 years to show that there is some loyalty in their toolkit. Yes, each case is different. Still, you end up with a red flag when you change a lot and it's one more hurdle versus other potential employees.

  • brianli

    Mark, again great post. Can you share your transition leaving BigCo to become an entrepreneur? How did you time it? Love to hear your perspective if/how your POV changes for consultants/bankers who work in an intense project/deal time-line basis.

    Ultimately, is it ok to leave mid-engagement? Is it fair to your team? Is it fair to the employer, let’s just say “ConsCo A”? ;) Is it fair to the client? Perhaps one should stick with your line re: “Trust me, if they were doing layoffs they wouldn’t keep you an extra month just to be nice.”

  • mmeehan

    Great post and I agree with you Mark. Whenever you start to qualify their hopping by using excuses like “dead end job” or lack of growth within the company, I start to question their decision making process in the first place. Were they thinking long term when they took the job or were they after a short term salary or title fix? Serial job hoppers are never going to be satisfied and always see the greener pastures.

  • marklanday

    Mark,
    Excellent post. As an executive recruitment professional, I agree with your thoughts. The on-boarding process starts at the beginning of the recruitment process, not as an after thought to avoiding counter offers. It doesn't reflect well to loose good people and sometime buying time is an option for the other company. Another method is early in the process is walking the candidate backwards on the calendar from the press release date to current date.

  • http://www.lukasvedral.cz/ Lukas Vedral

    Thx for another great article. I'm always looking forward to seeing new posts from you in my rss reader!

  • http://www.madmagz.com Youssef Rahoui

    As a French entrepreneur, I can say it is true. And that is not even the whole story. It is incredibly expensive to hire people. If you pay a guy 100 (fully loaded), you still need to pay 70-80 of taxes. It is one of the biggest barrier to success I can imagine.

    It is true that you have a lot of subsidies but they are a incredibly complex and time consuming. I would much rather get no subsidie from anybody and left on my own to build my company but just not get hindered by all those stupid taxes (at least for the 1st year) and paperwork.

  • http://how2startup.com/ Roy Rodenstein

    Using anchoring and presumptive close… very nice Mark. Basically you're letting the employee play Good Cop with their boss, using you/the absentee New Employer as Bad Cop.

    And I am paranoid about the most vulnerable moment after a close right there with you. I have only ever lost a couple of people, when their boss literally offered them a 50% raise and a big promotion on the spot. Invariably those people come back to you 3 months later when they realize it was just a negotiating tactic and they're now even more unhappy at their existing job.

    Of course you were uncharacteristically a “nice guy” in this post… you can lay it on MUCH thicker than that, e.g. the candidate can tell their boss that you have other people you'll bring in if they can't start in a week.

  • jeffsilbert

    My first post on your blog — how have your portfolio firms particularly in the area of sales scaled their teams. What is the breakdown between social networking/networking vs recruiters(contingency/retained) in terms of % of hires and also track record (looking back in hindsight on performance).

  • http://bwasearch.blogspot.com Donna Brewington White

    I must say that from the vantage point of a recruiter I agree with most of this. The point about not backing off just because the offer has been accepted is especially poignant. Most recruiters learn early on that the job doesn't end with the acceptance of the offer and sometimes not even for several months. It is not uncommon for someone to leave within the first six months to return to their previous employer.

    A soapbox moment here: Companies put herculean effort into RECRUITING and then ignore the new employee's TRANSITION into the company. Sort of like putting all the effort into preparing for the wedding and not paying much attention to the marriage. For the most successful hires, there should be an intentional transition plan. Just sayin…

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    re: good cop / bad cop – yeah, perhaps I should have explained it that way. That's part of my verbal pitch to employees. Make me the bad guy.

    re: your last paragraph – that's probably a little bit further than I would actually go but I understand the sentiment.

    Thanks for the input.

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    Thanks for commenting! It really depends on level. Just recruiting a VP Sales and went through an executive recruiter. Done some contingency search. Done some LinkedIn. All over the place, really. It's so situational.

  • http://beta.chatfe.com/ Paul Orlando

    Nice post. Good considerations for doing what's best for both the individual employee and the company they're going to join.

  • http://how2startup.com/ Roy Rodenstein

    Yeah you don't want to use scare tactics, just an example that when quitting your job sometimes you need to be armed with a reason. The boss very likely may ask “well, why do they need you in 2 weeks. It won't kill them to wait another couple of weeks, they're no more important than we are” etc.

  • http://www.google.com/profiles/alextknight Alex Knight

    Great article Mark. My only gripe with your article is I wished you ran spell check on it before you posted :)

  • http://yorkstreetproperties.com/ Lance Puig

    This is so true. I'd rather hire employees who have a record of staying in a company for more than 2 years. And that's why I offer a competitive package to my employees, and when I see my employees staying for more than 6 months, I make sure all the more that they are better taken care of.

  • brianli

    Mark, again great post. Can you share your transition leaving BigCo to become an entrepreneur? How did you time it? Love to hear your perspective if/how your POV changes for consultants/bankers who work in an intense project/deal time-line basis.

    Ultimately, is it ok to leave mid-engagement? Is it fair to your team? Is it fair to the employer, let’s just say “ConsCo A”? ;) Is it fair to the client? Perhaps one should stick with your line re: “Trust me, if they were doing layoffs they wouldn’t keep you an extra month just to be nice.”

  • http://jasonkolb.com jasonkolb

    I get that, but my point is that you're teaching your brand new employees a
    BAD way of negotiating even before day one! (I will leave the encouragement
    to lie out of this, since I may just be very anal about that personally.)

    Your first interactions with new employees are so critical. Impressions are
    being formed and they're learning what “the boss” (you) likes. You have an
    opportunity to show them a shitty way of negotiating, or start showing them
    how to creatively solve problems in ways that will benefit you more than the
    shitty negotiating would anyway.

    Let me give you a quick example k?

    Let's say I'm hiring a programmer (I'll call him Sawyer because I was
    watching Lost last night) and I say “you really need to start in two weeks,
    so here's a script you can consider for ideas, it tells you to tell your
    current employer that I'm pressuring you to leave in one week, so they'll be
    more okay with two in the end”. So it works, fine. Sawyer starts in two
    weeks.

    Now let's say a year down the road I'm working on a project with Sawyer and
    it's behind. I'm two weeks away from shipping to my first customer and
    there's three weeks worth of work. There is a certain set of features that
    need to be done, and the customer is demanding them on the promised
    deadline. They absolutely have to be done or it won't ship. So Sawyer is
    working directly with the customer, so in his mind it's a choice between
    working nights and weekends to make the customer happy or dealing with (or
    losing) an angry or upset customer.

    He wants to not work nights and weekends. This is his position. In his
    mind the problem is now “work nights and weekends, or work nights and
    weekends”. “Work two more weeks or not work two more weeks”. He's not
    thinking about the underlying interests and trying to address THOSE, he is
    trying to address YOUR HEAD.

    There are any number of creative solutions to the above scenario where the
    product could still ship and Sawyer wouldn't have to work nights and
    weekends. But I haven't trained him to think creatively I've trained him to
    do positional negotiation. I want him to be able to think of that, because
    THAT is what makes MY life easier. Employees who can solve problems without
    need to get me involved.

    I want every employee I hire to be a rock star, and if they're merely a
    karaoke singer I'm going to start coaching them at every opportunity. I do
    not want to be a babysitter.

    I like the general idea of arming your new employee with what he/she needs
    to quit quickly and efficiently, but use it as an opportunity to start your
    relationship off on the right foot and start training the new employee to be
    a superstar.

  • http://www.lukasvedral.cz/ Lukas Vedral

    Thx for another great article. I'm always looking forward to seeing new posts from you in my rss reader!

  • http://bwasearch.blogspot.com Donna Brewington White

    I must say that from the vantage point of a recruiter I agree with most of this. The point about not backing off just because the offer has been accepted is especially poignant. Most recruiters learn early on that “recruiting” doesn't end with the acceptance of the offer and sometimes not even for several months. It is not uncommon for someone to leave within the first six months to return to their previous employer.

    A soapbox moment here: Companies put herculean effort into RECRUITING and then ignore the new employee's TRANSITION into the company. Sort of like putting all the effort into preparing for the wedding and not paying much attention to the marriage. For the most successful hires, there should be an intentional transition plan. Just sayin…

  • mattblumberg

    Great post…though I have mixed feelings about it as an entrepreneur on the hiring end.

    You say: There’s nothing worse than losing an employee that said yes but never joined. — I totally agree!

    You say: You need to get them in your doors as quickly as possible. — Here's where I'm not entirely certain. There's much to what you say about not having someone on the way in get suckered into staying months on end at their existing job. But I always feel like I want to set the right tone with someone coming into my company as well. I don't like to apply huge amounts of pressure so they worry that they've gotten themselves into a sweat shop. I want people to take time off between jobs so they're ready to charge in with a clear head. I want them to feel good about their transition.

    Usually there's a happy medium one can negotiate here.

  • http://jasonkolb.com jasonkolb

    I get that, but my point is that you're teaching your brand new employees a
    BAD way of negotiating even before day one! (I will leave the encouragement
    to lie out of this, since I may just be very anal about that personally.)

    Your first interactions with new employees are so critical. Impressions are
    being formed and they're learning what “the boss” (you) likes. You have an
    opportunity to show them a shitty way of negotiating, or start showing them
    how to creatively solve problems in ways that will benefit you more than the
    shitty negotiating would anyway.

    Let me give you a quick example k?

    Let's say I'm hiring a programmer (I'll call him Sawyer because I was
    watching Lost last night) and I say “you really need to start in two weeks,
    so here's a script you can consider for ideas, it tells you to tell your
    current employer that I'm pressuring you to leave in one week, so they'll be
    more okay with two in the end”. So it works, fine. Sawyer starts in two
    weeks.

    Now let's say a year down the road I'm working on a project with Sawyer and
    it's behind. I'm two weeks away from shipping to my first customer and
    there's three weeks worth of work. There is a certain set of features that
    need to be done, and the customer is demanding them on the promised
    deadline. They absolutely have to be done or it won't ship. So Sawyer is
    working directly with the customer, so in his mind it's a choice between
    working nights and weekends to make the customer happy or dealing with (or
    losing) an angry or upset customer.

    He wants to not work nights and weekends. This is his position. In his
    mind the problem is now “work nights and weekends, or work nights and
    weekends”. “Work two more weeks or not work two more weeks”. He's not
    thinking about the underlying interests and trying to address THOSE, he is
    trying to address YOUR HEAD.

    There are any number of creative solutions to the above scenario where the
    product could still ship and Sawyer wouldn't have to work nights and
    weekends. But I haven't trained him to think creatively I've trained him to
    do positional negotiation. I want him to be able to think of that, because
    THAT is what makes MY life easier. Employees who can solve problems without
    need to get me involved.

    I want every employee I hire to be a rock star, and if they're merely a
    karaoke singer I'm going to start coaching them at every opportunity. I do
    not want to be a babysitter.

    I like the general idea of arming your new employee with what he/she needs
    to quit quickly and efficiently, but use it as an opportunity to start your
    relationship off on the right foot and start training the new employee to be
    a superstar.

  • mattblumberg

    Great post…though I have mixed feelings about it as an entrepreneur on the hiring end.

    You say: There’s nothing worse than losing an employee that said yes but never joined. — I totally agree!

    You say: You need to get them in your doors as quickly as possible. — Here's where I'm not entirely certain. There's much to what you say about not having someone on the way in get suckered into staying months on end at their existing job. But I always feel like I want to set the right tone with someone coming into my company as well. I don't like to apply huge amounts of pressure so they worry that they've gotten themselves into a sweat shop. I want people to take time off between jobs so they're ready to charge in with a clear head. I want them to feel good about their transition.

    Usually there's a happy medium one can negotiate here.

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    Helping somebody negotiate in what will be a tough situation is not encouraging lying or bad behavior. Extrapolating that saying that negotiating your exit package encourages employees to lie about dates they'll be shipping products is a stretch. I get that you don't like my advice on negotiating and it ruffles your sensibilities. That's OK. Not everybody likes me. I suspect not everybody likes you. Let's just agree that we both have different styles. Mine has worked for me, your for you. And obviously you won't want to be working with me any time soon ;-)

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    Helping somebody negotiate in what will be a tough situation is not encouraging lying or bad behavior. Extrapolating that saying that negotiating your exit package encourages employees to lie about dates they'll be shipping products is a stretch. I get that you don't like my advice on negotiating and it ruffles your sensibilities. That's OK. Not everybody likes me. I suspect not everybody likes you. Let's just agree that we both have different styles. Mine has worked for me, your for you. And obviously you won't want to be working with me any time soon ;-)

  • Ken

    Great post, Mark. Provides some awesome insight from both the employee's (my) perspective as well as the startup!

  • Ken

    Great post, Mark. Provides some awesome insight from both the employee's (my) perspective as well as the startup!

  • http://twitter.com/mshynar Michael Shynar

    Actually, I’ve personally witnessed two incidents where BigCo kept an employee an extra month to aid transitioning. Perhaps it is more of the norm here in Israel.

  • BS

    Many thanks. I'm going through this now and your post has helped me tremendously.

  • BS

    Many thanks. I'm going through this now and your post has helped me tremendously.

  • http://www.whatihearyousayingis.com/ Blake

    That is a great point. I have a personal philosophy of no counter-offers (taken or given) and I generally share this with folks on my team early in their employment. As a manager, it keeps me on my toes to extend my best folks a tempered version of the Netflix approach described above — and as an employee it sharpens my resolve to commit to an exit when it's time to move on.

  • http://www.whatihearyousayingis.com/ Blake

    That is a great point. I have a personal philosophy of no counter-offers (taken or given) and I generally share this with folks on my team early in their employment. As a manager, it keeps me on my toes to extend my best folks a tempered version of the Netflix approach described above — and as an employee it sharpens my resolve to commit to an exit when it's time to move on.