Twitter’s Acquisition, Chirp & Managing Developer Relationships

Posted on Apr 10, 2010 | 46 comments


So Twitter is buying and building Twitter clients.  I don’t find this surprising at all.  In fact, I said as much in September 09 at a Twitter conference in LA on a panel that Guy Kawasaki was moderating.  I said in the following video that I thought Twitter would buy Seesmic, the company that makes one of the most popular Twitter clients.   (If you’re interested you can watch my comments by fast forwarding to minute 31.25 and listening for about 90 seconds.  There’s also a segment that I like from minute 12.30 for two minutes talking about why I think people wrongly obsess about their number of Twitter followers and had a nice little debate about it with Guy.  Short answer: quality is more important than quantity).

So why did I believe it was the right thing for Twitter to acquire a Twitter client?  First, I believe that Seesmic has an excellent product – especially the web version of their product and that having another senior and experienced exec like Loic Le Meur would be great for Twitter.  I guess it may be impractical for Twitter to acquire Seesmic given it has raised considerable amounts of venture capital (reportedly $12 million) but the broader point for me is that I always believed Twitter should control the client versions of its product.

Think about the creative tension.  If a single Twitter client could amass a large volumes of users (lets say 20m+) then the relationship with the consumer is divided between the client and Twitter itself.  Ultimately to become defensible the client application would want to diversify its “stream” so would start supporting Facebook, MySpace and perhaps even IM products.  I said this many times publicly before it ever started happening with Tweetdeck and Seesmic.

In fact, I encouraged my favorite IM aggregator client, Digsby, to go the opposite direction and become a Twitter client also.  They have done this (they had the idea, too, so I’m not taking credit for egging them on).  In a world in which you have strong client applications for consuming “multiproduct streams” then they gain relative power to any individual stream (e.g. Twitter).  This also would give the client the upper hand in discussions with advertisers, image providers, URL shorteners, etc.

And aside from having great market power (the main reason for Twitter to own the client and the customer) advertising is one of the primary reasons that I believe Twitter needs to own the client applications.  As people consume Twitter on mobile clients they are almost definitionally not doing so on Twitter.com.  How can you offer up advertisements as Twitter if you don’t control the place where people consume their Tweets?  Kind of obvious, huh?  I still think that Twitter should acquire Seesmic rather than just build their best features but I’m now betting that they won’t do so.  And I also think that Seesmic can carve out a meaningful position for itself as a multistream provider.

But wait, aren’t you the guy who invested in Ad.ly, the in-stream advertising company?   Aren’t they going to get squashed as Twitter starts to focus more on advertising?  No, I don’t think so.

Two things:

1) when I invested in Ad.ly I made sure that their thesis was in-stream (as opposed to being a side-bar advertisement like Google AdSense).  I believe this is important because it means that Ad.ly is integrated with the content while being specifically denoted as an ad.  So the ad appears wherever content is consumed.  It also means that the publisher (person writing the status update) can share in the monetization.  It also leads to higher CTR’s (click-through rates) than side-bar advertising in all of the tests we’ve run.

2) I also clarified that the strategy of Ad.ly would be “multi-stream” ad network (e.g. not just Twitter) and we’ve made huge strides in that realm that will be realized and then revealed over time.

So I agree with Fred Wilson’s post that startup applications shouldn’t simply be plugging in minor feature gaps in Twitter’s offering.  Or if they do they should do so without raising venture capital so that they can still be acquired for reasonable prices.  Actually, the latter could be a reasonable strategy for super technical entrepreneurs who can sustain themselves without big financing needs (see: Atebits, owner of Tweetie). I articulated in a previous post that startups should not treat the iPhone as a business but rather as a channel.  The same is true of Twitter, and as a VC I would personally never fund a company that looked to simply plug a functional gap in Twitter.

So how does this all relate to the upcoming Twitter Chirp conference next week? I think Twitter made a minor gaffe by announcing their Blackberry app and their acquisition of Atebits (Tweetie) before the Chirp conference. My rationale is that I think they’ve set the cat amongst the pigeons right before their most significant conference to date and I think this discussion might subsume anything else that they wanted to be the centerpiece of the conference. From a PR perspective I would have made those announcements 2 weeks after the conference.  But in the long run this will all be forgotten, I’m just sayin’.

But what should Twitter now do at Chirp and how should they treat the community? I think there is much that they can learn from Salesforce.com. And I saw a lot of this first hand in Salesforce’s acquisition of my company, Koral, which was a content management company. Naturally every other CMS company was pissed off and felt that they had wasted all of their investment in integration with Salesforce.  Immediately after the acquisition we held meetings with all of the integrated CMS vendors and highlighted to them which bits we were going to make our core platform and which bits we weren’t planning to offer ourselves.  We didn’t have the resources to do it all.  Specifically we encouraged vertical applications like financial services and healthcare. We asked them if they would use our CMS API’s and encouraged them to partner even more closely with us.  In retrospect we could have also encouraged corporate video integration more.

And Salesforce did this more broadly in all of their key areas. Salesforce was very good at managing the 1-year roadmap so at any point in time we had a pretty good idea about what we would be developing and what we wouldn’t. We also knew what we wanted to build but wouldn’t be able to get to. Often these were things that would make Salesforce more competitive vis-a-vis Oracle and Microsoft. Salesforce was excellent at outlining to the developer community what they considered “core” and what white space they wanted filled. If they gave you the white space you knew you had a good period of time to build a business without being boxed out by Salesforce and you knew that Marc Benioff was likely to highlight you at a conference or with journalists. Importantly, all of this was done privately, as it should be.

So if I were running Chirp that would be my top objective. I would want to hold up a “high level” road map of what Twitter views as important to build themselves while being careful not to step on existing businesses in the short term. I say “high level” because Chirp is obviously now a major and quasi public event so they can’t say anything that they expect to stay confidential. As important as talking about the roadmap will be marketing the white space that they don’t plan to fill. They should make clear statements about areas that they don’t plan to build in the next 12-18 months and areas that they would like to see be built.  This should be as public as possible.

The other thing that Salesforce is genius at is using these seminal events to market success stories of their developers. Salesforce’s annual DreamForce conference holds sessions for their developers to market what they’re doing to potential customers and partners. They have employees who know these apps sit in on the break-out sessions and talk with customers, analysts, journalists and VC’s about why they love that particular area.  The validation from Salesforce.com helps tremendously.

And finally, the most important meetings will be post Chirp. I think that Twitter has a responsibility to quietly reach out to vendors who might be in their crosshairs in the next 6 months and warn them that this might happen. An obvious example would be URL shorteners, photo sharing or video sharing platforms, Twitter authority platforms or whatever else Twitter has in store (I’m not privy to this so I’m not implying that they will move into these exact areas). Having a quiet chat that “we haven’t made any final decisions and may never move into your space but it is on our short-list of areas that are likely some day. We wanted to give you advance notice to help you pivot if you choose to. Here are some areas that we won’t likely touch that we would encourage you to consider.”

At Chirp I would say, “Look, there are times we’re going to build functionality that conflicts with what an application developer has built.  Other times we may make acquisitions and almost every acquisition leaves some company needing to pivot in a different direction.  Our promise to you is that we will do our best to communicate with you often.  We will be direct and forthright.  Where possible we will try to signal the areas we hope to own one day.  But in any platform community this happens.  We care about all of you and will do our best minimize the fallout to anybody.”

If Twitter wants to build a long-term, health, happy ecosystem this type of approach will suit it well.

  • http://www.platosforms.com Darryl Siry

    Mark – perhaps Twitter figured that by letting the cat out of the bag before Chirp they could deal with the reverberations in the community of developers in person at the conference. While its true that this news is going to dominate the conference, perhaps thats best. It might have been the best route to announce the news in person at the conference to be as straight up as possible and avoid all the ruminating leading into Chirp.

  • http://www.newsbasis.com Darryl Siry

    Mark – perhaps Twitter figured that by letting the cat out of the bag before Chirp they could deal with the reverberations in the community of developers in person at the conference. While its true that this news is going to dominate the conference, perhaps thats best. It might have been the best route to announce the news in person at the conference to be as straight up as possible and avoid all the ruminating leading into Chirp.

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    If I were them I would have held Chirp first and given the community a chance to see that things like this would eventually happen. They could have had a mature conversation about it. They would have been playing offense. Eventually the same news would have happened but they would have controlled the cycle. Plus, they could have given some companies affected time to think about their own internal communications strategies. As it is they'll start this week playing defense. I don't see how that helps?

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    If I were them I would have held Chirp first and given the community a chance to see that things like this would eventually happen. They could have had a mature conversation about it. They would have been playing offense. Eventually the same news would have happened but they would have controlled the cycle. Plus, they could have given some companies affected time to think about their own internal communications strategies. As it is they'll start this week playing defense. I don't see how that helps?

  • http://yountlabs.com/ marshally

    The thing that I suspect is different between the two is that the Twitter ecosystem is based on a free, publishing platform while Salesforce is a paid product which is focused on solving real business problems. As such, public perception of Twitter's ecosystem may be dominated by a handful of applications that deliver real innovation and value, but most of the actual apps out there are boring, spammy, or both.

    To make matters worse, the number of folks actually doing anything interesting with Twitter's API is actually quite small. I'm concerned that the 'genetic diversity' just isn't available in this ecosystem to support the 'outline the whitespace and highlight best of breed apps' approach that you suggest.

    Even the Disqus comment stream below, has largely turned into a mindless stream of RT or 'look what I read' messages. (and sadly Disqus used to be one of the apps that innovates and adds value). I thought Disqus was supposed to be about conversations?

    Maybe the acquisition of Tweetie will cause a shakeout in the world of also-ran-Twitter clients, and some of these developers will turn around and do something really interesting. I'd love to see that happen. But for now, the Twitterverse does not need another iPhone client or URL shortener.

  • http://yountlabs.com/ marshally

    The thing that I suspect is different between the two is that the Twitter ecosystem is based on a free, publishing platform while Salesforce is a paid product which is focused on solving real business problems. As such, public perception of Twitter's ecosystem may be dominated by a handful of applications that deliver real innovation and value, but most of the actual apps out there are boring, spammy, or both.

    To make matters worse, the number of folks actually doing anything interesting with Twitter's API is actually quite small. I'm concerned that the 'genetic diversity' just isn't available in this ecosystem to support the 'outline the whitespace and highlight best of breed apps' approach that you suggest.

    Even the Disqus comment stream below, has largely turned into a mindless stream of RT or 'look what I read' messages. (and sadly Disqus used to be one of the apps that innovates and adds value). I thought Disqus was supposed to be about conversations?

    Maybe the acquisition of Tweetie will cause a shakeout in the world of also-ran-Twitter clients, and some of these developers will turn around and do something really interesting. I'd love to see that happen. But for now, the Twitterverse does not need another iPhone client or URL shortener.

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    I would point out that the majority of apps on Salesforce are also worthless. But yes, there are some really great and thoughtful commercial apps there, too. Thanks for the counter points. Interesting. BTW, Disqus powers this conversation so I'm not sure I'd be so quick to dismiss them. The “reactions” below pulls in the Twitter stream. But without Disqus, which helps create more of a “conversation” most commenting sections on websites are pretty dull.

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    I would point out that the majority of apps on Salesforce are also worthless. But yes, there are some really great and thoughtful commercial apps there, too. Thanks for the counter points. Interesting. BTW, Disqus powers this conversation so I'm not sure I'd be so quick to dismiss them. The “reactions” below pulls in the Twitter stream. But without Disqus, which helps create more of a “conversation” most commenting sections on websites are pretty dull.

  • http://azeemazhar.com/ azeemazhar

    Mark does twitter yet know where to draw the line? the business + business model is emerging, as are the user modalities.
    what they can figure is
    a. it is hard to hire and get great people , acquisition can help that
    b. there may be a risk in letting clients run away with everything, so time to move upstream
    c. ultimately, they don't have sufficient line of site to how people actually behave dipping in and out of twitter. they see client requests, they don't have code running on my desktop.

  • http://azeemazhar.com/ azeemazhar

    Mark does twitter yet know where to draw the line? the business + business model is emerging, as are the user modalities.
    what they can figure is
    a. it is hard to hire and get great people , acquisition can help that
    b. there may be a risk in letting clients run away with everything, so time to move upstream
    c. ultimately, they don't have sufficient line of site to how people actually behave dipping in and out of twitter. they see client requests, they don't have code running on my desktop.

  • http://derrickshields.tumblr.com/ Derrick Shields

    Twitter could have partnered with a company like Ad.ly to serve in-stream ads regardless of the client application, and they probably still should regardless of what happens with Tweetie.

    There are ways Twitter can achieve most of their objectives through developer API agreements. The acquisition was more about pre-existing users and eyeballs than technology. Just because twitter owns the client now doesn't mean it will be the best, and I expect that we'll see better clients pop up in the near future, so Twitter should be thinking about ways to achieve their objectives (monetization, analytics, etc) through their API.

  • http://derrickshields.tumblr.com/ Derrick Shields

    Twitter could have partnered with a company like Ad.ly to serve in-stream ads regardless of the client application, and they probably still should regardless of what happens with Tweetie.

    There are ways Twitter can achieve most of their objectives through developer API agreements. The acquisition was more about pre-existing users and eyeballs than technology. Just because twitter owns the client now doesn't mean it will be the best, and I expect that we'll see better clients pop up in the near future, so Twitter should be thinking about ways to achieve their objectives (monetization, analytics, etc) through their API.

  • http://twici.com/ Pedro Ferreira

    I agree that they should have waited to reveal the deal after Chirp. This acquisition makes sense for Twitter and i think that the other players should focus on their business models and improve their apps if they want to survive. Just because Twitter got a client it doesn't mean that users will leave the existing clients and flock to Tweetie(Twitter for iPhone).
    As for the platform i think that there's still room to build apps even if they “collide” with Twitter later on.
    The key is to have a community who supports the app and to have a clear business model so that if Twitter decides to enter the space and doesn't choose your app, you can still survive…
    This is what we'll try to do with our next app.

  • http://twici.com/ Pedro Ferreira

    I agree that they should have waited to reveal the deal after Chirp. This acquisition makes sense for Twitter and i think that the other players should focus on their business models and improve their apps if they want to survive. Just because Twitter got a client it doesn't mean that users will leave the existing clients and flock to Tweetie(Twitter for iPhone).
    As for the platform i think that there's still room to build apps even if they “collide” with Twitter later on.
    The key is to have a community who supports the app and to have a clear business model so that if Twitter decides to enter the space and doesn't choose your app, you can still survive…
    This is what we'll try to do with our next app.

  • http://graysky.org graysky

    Good points about the communication from Twitter to 3rd party developers. As someone who watches the twitter dev community closely (I work at oneforty, which aims to help promote twitter apps), I was a bit surprised there wasn't a special message to twitter devs (on the google group or elsewhere) – just the main blog post about the acquisition. Presumably Twitter will talk about this at Chirp next week, but from a PR standpoint it likely could have been done better.

    I think the biggest difference in the analogy between Salesforce & Twitter (as Chris Dixon points out well in his post), is that I'm not sure Twitter knows their 1 year roadmap nor exactly how their ad business model will shake out. So I think it will be difficult for them to communicate what will be “core”. From Fred Wilson's list of possible killer apps: are “enterprise” apps non-core? Are verticals built around the tweet data? Are “discovery” apps? I think without knowing exactly where Twitter is aiming, it is hard to rule in/out at this stage.

  • http://graysky.org graysky

    Good points about the communication from Twitter to 3rd party developers. As someone who watches the twitter dev community closely (I work at oneforty, which aims to help promote twitter apps), I was a bit surprised there wasn't a special message to twitter devs (on the google group or elsewhere) – just the main blog post about the acquisition. Presumably Twitter will talk about this at Chirp next week, but from a PR standpoint it likely could have been done better.

    I think the biggest difference in the analogy between Salesforce & Twitter (as Chris Dixon points out well in his post), is that I'm not sure Twitter knows their 1 year roadmap nor exactly how their ad business model will shake out. So I think it will be difficult for them to communicate what will be “core”. From Fred Wilson's list of possible killer apps: are “enterprise” apps non-core? Are verticals built around the tweet data? Are “discovery” apps? I think without knowing exactly where Twitter is aiming, it is hard to rule in/out at this stage.

  • http://how2startup.com/ Roy Rodenstein

    Good tips from SalesForce, certainly one of the best companies at fostering an ecosystem. I thought Apple did a great job showcasing Pandora and Skype last week, along those lines.

    As you, Chris Dixon and others are saying, this Twitter fallout was completely predictable- and was indeed predicted several times. I think the main problem is what you get at at the end- Communication.

    Historically Twitter has not had a very strong public face, even to developers. It's been largely ad-hoc, partly due to their hacker culture and partly due to just trying to hold on for dear life in the face of incredible growth. This vacuum of “official word” fostered a perception among developers of Twitter as “nicer” and more philosophically against competing with their offerings. Such has been the vacuum that, conspiracy theories aside, Fred's post last week was as close to official notice as Twitter has come. It's very unusual for a company to rely on a board member as its bouncer so publically.

    Problem is, you can't raise money at a $1B valuation and then “play nice with the other schoolkids at recess.” It's like that guy from the show Chuck who is a spy but can't actually pull the trigger and kill anyone… until he really really has to, and then he suddenly can.

  • http://how2startup.com/ Roy Rodenstein

    Good tips from SalesForce, certainly one of the best companies at fostering an ecosystem. I thought Apple did a great job showcasing Pandora and Skype last week, along those lines.

    As you, Chris Dixon and others are saying, this Twitter fallout was completely predictable- and was indeed predicted several times. I think the main problem is what you get at at the end- Communication.

    Historically Twitter has not had a very strong public face, even to developers. It's been largely ad-hoc, partly due to their hacker culture and partly due to just trying to hold on for dear life in the face of incredible growth. This vacuum of “official word” fostered a perception among developers of Twitter as “nicer” and more philosophically against competing with their offerings. Such has been the vacuum that, conspiracy theories aside, Fred's post last week was as close to official notice as Twitter has come. It's very unusual for a company to rely on a board member as its bouncer so publically.

    Problem is, you can't raise money at a $1B valuation and then “play nice with the other schoolkids at recess.” It's like that guy from the show Chuck who is a spy but can't actually pull the trigger and kill anyone… until he really really has to, and then he suddenly can.

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    Yeah, I don't fault them for moving upstream. In fact, as I pointed out in that video – I predicted it 7 months ago. I think it's more of a communication issue.

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    Yeah, I don't fault them for moving upstream. In fact, as I pointed out in that video – I predicted it 7 months ago. I think it's more of a communication issue.

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    Yeah, but client apps can only really succeed now if they are multi-stream. I don't think Twitter only client apps are sustainable unless they are “lifestyle” businesses built by one or two person teams.

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    Yeah, but client apps can only really succeed now if they are multi-stream. I don't think Twitter only client apps are sustainable unless they are “lifestyle” businesses built by one or two person teams.

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    Yeah, it's true that some businesses became huge by building large followings inside of other companies eco-systems. See: Photobucket / YouTube with MySpace and PayPal with eBay.

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    Yeah, it's true that some businesses became huge by building large followings inside of other companies eco-systems. See: Photobucket / YouTube with MySpace and PayPal with eBay.

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    Yeah, I accept that they don't yet know where they're going. But I would find it surprising at this stage in their business if they couldn't at least predict their next 6 months roadmap and know what their top priorities for the next year are. Also, most companies at this stage know what features they'd like to see built but won't get around to given resource constraints. Some communication is always better than none.

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    Yeah, I accept that they don't yet know where they're going. But I would find it surprising at this stage in their business if they couldn't at least predict their next 6 months roadmap and know what their top priorities for the next year are. Also, most companies at this stage know what features they'd like to see built but won't get around to given resource constraints. Some communication is always better than none.

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    You make an interesting point. What Salesforce.com has is one of the world's best pitch men in Marc Benioff and he's also very instinctually good on thinking about the ecosystem. Maybe Twitter needs to have somebody internally with a more public and dominant voice?

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    You make an interesting point. What Salesforce.com has is one of the world's best pitch men in Marc Benioff and he's also very instinctually good on thinking about the ecosystem. Maybe Twitter needs to have somebody internally with a more public and dominant voice?

  • http://www.howardlindzon.com howardlindzon

    Hey mark. In agreement. I would like to give them the benefit of a doubt but it's pretty hard. Lots to learn on all sides. See u Thursday. Good meeting u and next time will be at full speed past the food poisoning

  • http://www.howardlindzon.com howardlindzon

    Hey mark. In agreement. I would like to give them the benefit of a doubt but it's pretty hard. Lots to learn on all sides. See u Thursday. Good meeting u and next time will be at full speed past the food poisoning

  • http://www.howardlindzon.com howardlindzon

    Exactly. Hopefully dick will be able to really stru his no nonsense stuff

  • http://www.howardlindzon.com howardlindzon

    Exactly. Hopefully dick will be able to really stru his no nonsense stuff

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    Thanks, Howard. Was great to meet you, too. LMK if you want to stay over at the SLS (Starwood property!) because we're getting discounted rates. As I walked into breakfast the other day I half expected to see your Twitter / Disqus image! Hope you're feeling better.

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    Thanks, Howard. Was great to meet you, too. LMK if you want to stay over at the SLS (Starwood property!) because we're getting discounted rates. As I walked into breakfast the other day I half expected to see your Twitter / Disqus image! Hope you're feeling better.

  • http://www.howardlindzon.com howardlindzon

    perfect. i do. see u thursday eve

  • http://www.howardlindzon.com howardlindzon

    perfect. i do. see u thursday eve

  • Ben Sternfeld

    Twitter lost it's soul last week and everyone knows it. That's the problem. By changing the paradigm they also killed their mojo. The developers will move on and find a way to return the favor.

  • Ben Sternfeld

    Twitter lost it's soul last week and everyone knows it. That's the problem. By changing the paradigm they also killed their mojo. The developers will move on and find a way to return the favor.

  • http://obscurelyfamous.com Daniel Ha

    I think you're confusing the reactions from the actual comment thread. We see the reactions as just something that augments the existing conversation here.

  • http://obscurelyfamous.com Daniel Ha

    I think you're confusing the reactions from the actual comment thread. We see the reactions as just something that augments the existing conversation here.

  • http://shwaag.com/ Eric Keosky-Smith

    Great comments Mark and thanks for the insight as to how some of the “old school” folks successfully manage their ecosystem. Had similar experiences at Intel (where btw their roadmaps were years out and they'd be building $2B factories around them – so you'd hope a software company could commit to at LEAST a 6 month view).

    While I love the concept of twitter the platform, I do not believe they have the internal fortitude nor management skills to drive this large a venture. I've been to two conferences so far where Twitter should have rocked, yet the executives fall flat and really provided no vision, acting all but bored to be there! That will have to change – and change soon – or the ecosystem will start to dissolve, momentum lost, twitter marginalized … which would be a crime as with the right tools this is a pretty powerful medium.

  • http://shwaag.com/ Eric Keosky-Smith

    Great comments Mark and thanks for the insight as to how some of the “old school” folks successfully manage their ecosystem. Had similar experiences at Intel (where btw their roadmaps were years out and they'd be building $2B factories around them – so you'd hope a software company could commit to at LEAST a 6 month view).

    While I love the concept of twitter the platform, I do not believe they have the internal fortitude nor management skills to drive this large a venture. I've been to two conferences so far where Twitter should have rocked, yet the executives fall flat and really provided no vision, acting all but bored to be there! That will have to change – and change soon – or the ecosystem will start to dissolve, momentum lost, twitter marginalized … which would be a crime as with the right tools this is a pretty powerful medium.

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    Yeah, I'm not sure they have been very effectively at marketing themselves at trade shows. I have seen them twice and both sessions were pretty flat / short on details. That said, I do believe that they have a pervasive platform for which much can be built if they execute. I'm certainly routing for them. Facebook winning everything isn't in everybody's best interest.

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    Yeah, I'm not sure they have been very effectively at marketing themselves at trade shows. I have seen them twice and both sessions were pretty flat / short on details. That said, I do believe that they have a pervasive platform for which much can be built if they execute. I'm certainly routing for them. Facebook winning everything isn't in everybody's best interest.

  • Rahul Chaudhary

    What do you think about Twitter's own ad platform affecting Tweetup which just launched couple of days ago?

  • Rahul Chaudhary

    What do you think about Twitter's own ad platform affecting Tweetup which just launched couple of days ago?