You Can’t Look for a Job from a Remote Location – It Doesn’t Work

Posted on May 28, 2010 | 185 comments


I’ve had this conversation so many times it’s painful.  A friend calls me up from “you name it” city: Boston, New York, Chicago, San Francisco and says, “I’m thinking about moving to Los Angeles (or SF, NY, etc) and I’d love to start interviewing.  Let me know if you hear of anything interesting.”

I guess when I hear things like this I revert back to my shock jock instincts and say, “Don’t bother.  If you’re committed to living in New York then move there.  Otherwise you’re not serious and you’ll never get the right job so don’t bother.”  Definitely gets shock value.  At least I have their attention.

Why do I give this blunt advice?

Lots of reasons.  Let’s start with the obvious.  Finding the best jobs takes a lot of commitment to taking many different networking meetings with executives, recruiters, entrepreneurs, VC’s, investment bankers, etc.  The best jobs (as you know) are found through personal connections.  The best jobs are the ones that have not already been put on a job board.  The best jobs are the ones that certainly haven’t gone out to an executive recruiter.  The reason these are the “best” jobs for you is that once it goes to an executive recruiter there will be a stack of 100 prospective recruits, 20 amazingly qualified resumes that will have phone or in-person interviews with the recruiter of which the company will meet 5-6.  So unless your last job is a mirror image of your next then good luck with those odds.

So it takes “spade work” to find the right job.  And that ain’t gonna happen from your LinkedIn messages to buddies you haven’t spoken to in 3 years.  It’s not even going to happen from your 3-day exploratory trips every 6-8 weeks.  It takes a sustained effort to get the right job.  Sure, you can land “a” job, just not “the” job.

And there are other reasons.

If you REALLY think you’re committed to Los Angeles – then just move there.  Make a life decision.  None of this wishy-washy hedging your bets.  I’ve heard every excuse – believe me.  “Well I don’t want to move to LA only to find out that I get a job in San Fran and now I have to move twice.  I mean I’d love to live in LA but what I really want is the perfect job wherever that is.”  Yawn.  OK, so you’re going to sub optimize your job opportunities in both LA and SF?  That’s a great strategy.

Now, I will give a carve out for young execs who really don’t care about geography and are junior enough that the perfect company or job doesn’t always matter.  You can look remotely.  But if you’re more senior fuggetaboutit.  I recently spoke with a 40 year old who was thinking about moving back to LA.  Really charming guy with great experience.  And he had some complicating factors that didn’t make it easy to just move here.  But here is what he told me, “I know that eventually I want to live back in LA.  100%.  That’s where my family is.”

So my feedback was, “Then taking a job in NY right now is really life dumb.  You might find a great job but it might keep you in NYC for the next 7-10 years if it goes really well.  At least 3-5.  Why do that if you KNOW you want to move back to LA.  Choose life.  Carpe diem.”

And there are more practical reasons.  Anybody who has any operational experience and common sense will never want to hire you anyways.  Why?  If you have operational experience then you’ve likely already been burned by somebody else just like yourself wanting to get hired for a remote job.  Here’s a few flavors:

– “I’m going to move to LA but my kids are in school.  As soon as the school year ends they’re going to move out.”  Code for, “I’m going to see how I like the job for 6 months.  I can’t drag my family to LA and then have to drag them back again if I don’t like the job.”  Fair enough.  I can understand the logic.  But I want people that I KNOW are committed to living in the city I’m hiring.  If I’m interviewing and your resume doesn’t say “California” on it somewhere I’ll always ask, “did you grow up in CA?  Do you have family here?  Why would you want to live in LA?”  No plausible motive = no job.  And if I can find an equivalent candidate already living here you can be sure you’re on the bottom of that stack.

– “I’m going to move my family to LA but I need to sell the house first.  I can’t afford to take a loss on it.  So I’ll commute for the first 6-12 months.”  Code for, “OK, I really DO have to sell my house but I also have a great excuse to hedge my bets and see whether I really like the company.  Yeah, I know I could probably rent the house out – but why should I do that?  I don’t mind commuting.”  Long distance, long-term commuting usually = unhappy family life = unhappy employee = less productive employee = unhappy you.

– “My wife is finishing up her masters at University of Chicago.  So I can’t move until she finishes.”  Again, understandable.  If she’s not up for transferring to UCLA – that’s fine.  Call me in 2 years when she’s been graduated.

But wait, there’s more!

Moving when you have a family is a big, fat hassle.  If your husband is going to relo with you to Boston then there are many hassles.  He’ll need to find a job.  You’ll need to find a nanny.  You’ll have to figure out where your kids will need to go to school.  You won’t know the other parents so you’ll have to put in a huge effort.  You won’t know which parts of town to live in and you’ll be in temporary accommodations for a couple of months while you search for your permanent spot.

Your wife doesn’t work?  You sure are going to enjoy those nights you have to stay in the office until 10pm and then come home to your wife who has no friends locally and is bored.  And that business trip to SF for a week to meet customers?  Fun.

How do I “know” all this?  I’ve been burned at least 3 times by people who were moving.  I’ve moved enough to know how distracting the first few months are.  I tell people all the time and, like many of you, they kind of doubt me.  I met a company who was raising money and was going to relo the CEO from the US to the UK and they wanted me to invest.  He and his young family had never lived abroad.  NFW.  I said to them, literally, “Your wife won’t be able to work there easily – no papers.  She’ll enjoy the first 2 months of exploring around and then you’re dead.  She’ll be bored and unhappy.  You’ll be under pressure every night to get home early.  After a year if she hasn’t been able to work she’ll be angling for you to move back to the States.”  And guess what?  Obvious, huh.  It happened exactly this way with this company.

Some things are so predictable.

If you’re deeply committed to living in a city you’ll move there.  If you really care about having the “perfect” job (not everybody does) then being in-market increases your probability 100x.  Choose life.  Choose your location.  Move there.  Get settled in.  Take the time to know the city.  Get your partner bedded down and comfortable with the place without the stress of your new work hours.  And then set out to shake every hand and kiss every baby in town until you’ve networked yourself into the idea role.

Good luck.

UPDATE: Just since the comment is coming up repeatedly in the comments section – I specially carved out “young people” from my argument.  Most young people are infinitely mobile.  Also, I need to carve out mid-level developers.  They tend to be fairly mobile.  Finally, I should carve out international people.  I talk about that in the comments.

So that leaves senior execs: Directors, VP, CEO types.  This is the group I’m mostly talking about.

  • http://twitter.com/ZStevens86 ZStevens86

    Your post couldn't be more spot-on. I have spent the last month looking for work in New York (from SF) and have had only minor success with positions that I'm not very interested in.

    I'm taking interviews anywhere I can get them, and I've had a few offers… but you're 100% correct when you say that the jobs you really want aren't on a job board anywhere.

    So, my interview skills are polished, and I'm moving to NY on 8/1/10 and I expect to find a job I'm excited about much easier.

    I feel like you wrote this post to me personally because I'm going through this right now. Totally applicable to my life.

  • http://twitter.com/ZStevens86 ZStevens86

    Your post couldn't be more spot-on. I have spent the last month looking for work in New York (from SF) and have had only minor success with positions that I'm not very interested in.

    I'm taking interviews anywhere I can get them, and I've had a few offers… but you're 100% correct when you say that the jobs you really want aren't on a job board anywhere.

    So, my interview skills are polished, and I'm moving to NY on 8/1/10 and I expect to find a job I'm excited about much easier.

    I feel like you wrote this post to me personally because I'm going through this right now. Totally applicable to my life.

  • http://thegypsyjetsetter.com Tai

    I definitely support relocating and living where you want to live. You can always find a job once you're at your new location, as stated in the posting. I should know as I've moved to several cities and lived in several countries over the last few years. I am always able to get up and move within two weeks, and certainly have the hang of it by now! Life is too short to be unhappy.

  • http://thegypsyjetsetter.com Tai

    I definitely support relocating and living where you want to live. You can always find a job once you're at your new location, as stated in the posting. I should know as I've moved to several cities and lived in several countries over the last few years. I am always able to get up and move within two weeks, and certainly have the hang of it by now! Life is too short to be unhappy.

  • http://www.belgravetrust.com Nick Baily

    I basically agree with everything in the post as it applies to advice for prospective *employees* looking for jobs.

    It's also masquerading as advice for employers though, and I'm not sure I'm 100% in agreement, perhaps just due to my personal experience hiring people.

    I'm NYC based, and some of the most successful hires I've ever made (as well as ones made by others in organizations I've been in) have been people fresh to NYC. In some cases yes, they move first and start looking. In other cases they've been recruited or brought in from elsewhere. Not all of them junior either, some with 10+ years in the field coming in at a pretty high level.

    Some of these people have been the best “deals” I've ever seen. Why?

    Well for one they are facing people like you who won't hire them. It's a supply/demand equation. They're less in demand, and FOR REASONS UNRELATED TO THEIR SKILLS. (sorry, no bolding in comments)

    That makes them a prospective good deal. And the corollaries are that people outside of NYC have a much different view of compensation than people in the city, they'll take way lower offers. Sure, yes they will figure out reasonably quickly that they can't live in NYC for what they thought they could. Well if they're great then you bring them up to market, what you would have had to have paid anyways, big deal.

    And secondly — also related to my supply/demand metaphor — they are more likely to be a bargain because they're not swimming in an over-fished pond. People who are living in NYC and truly exceptional tend to get noticed pretty quick. If someone has been here a few years or more and they're ready to join your company then one of two things must be true — they're undervalued by a stupid current employer (AND by the other firms they're interviewing with) or they're not actually as good as they look on paper. If they're great they have options. Sure you can get them, maybe you have brighter coloring and plumage, or are up for paying top dollar. Chances are that's not the case.

    On the flip side someone living elsewhere could well be truly exceptional and in a city where there's a bit of a glass ceiling for them. You might be the one to find out. And even when they do get settled in NYC there's a bit of the high school boyfriend mentality at work, where though they're up and running in the city they still have a view of searching for a job in NYC that's a bit warped as they never really did do it “properly” and at least in my experience they're not all that likely to start looking elsewhere right away. To them of course, getting jobs in NYC is really hard, nobody calls you back, etc… at least that's what happened last time they tried.

    Not really a disagreement – everything you say above I have trouble finding fault with. But as an employer, opening your eyes to the RIGHT candidate who's based elsewhere can be a great way to fish in virgin waters and maybe get a serious deal.

    $.02

  • http://www.belgravetrust.com Nick Baily

    I basically agree with everything in the post as it applies to advice for prospective *employees* looking for jobs.

    It's also masquerading as advice for employers though, and I'm not sure I'm 100% in agreement, perhaps just due to my personal experience hiring people.

    I'm NYC based, and some of the most successful hires I've ever made (as well as ones made by others in organizations I've been in) have been people fresh to NYC. In some cases yes, they move first and start looking. In other cases they've been recruited or brought in from elsewhere. Not all of them junior either, some with 10+ years in the field coming in at a pretty high level.

    Some of these people have been the best “deals” I've ever seen. Why?

    Well for one they are facing people like you who won't hire them. It's a supply/demand equation. They're less in demand, and FOR REASONS UNRELATED TO THEIR SKILLS. (sorry, no bolding in comments)

    That makes them a prospective good deal. And the corollaries are that people outside of NYC have a much different view of compensation than people in the city, they'll take way lower offers. Sure, yes they will figure out reasonably quickly that they can't live in NYC for what they thought they could. Well if they're great then you bring them up to market, what you would have had to have paid anyways, big deal.

    And secondly — also related to my supply/demand metaphor — they are more likely to be a bargain because they're not swimming in an over-fished pond. People who are living in NYC and truly exceptional tend to get noticed pretty quick. If someone has been here a few years or more and they're ready to join your company then one of two things must be true — they're undervalued by a stupid current employer (AND by the other firms they're interviewing with) or they're not actually as good as they look on paper. If they're great they have options. Sure you can get them, maybe you have brighter coloring and plumage, or are up for paying top dollar. Chances are that's not the case.

    On the flip side someone living elsewhere could well be truly exceptional and in a city where there's a bit of a glass ceiling for them. You might be the one to find out. And even when they do get settled in NYC there's a bit of the high school boyfriend mentality at work, where though they're up and running in the city they still have a view of searching for a job in NYC that's a bit warped as they never really did do it “properly” and at least in my experience they're not all that likely to start looking elsewhere right away. To them of course, getting jobs in NYC is really hard, nobody calls you back, etc… at least that's what happened last time they tried.

    Not really a disagreement – everything you say above I have trouble finding fault with. But as an employer, opening your eyes to the RIGHT candidate who's based elsewhere can be a great way to fish in virgin waters and maybe get a serious deal.

    $.02

  • http://www.justinherrick.com Justin Herrick

    Lets hope so!

  • http://www.justinherrick.com Justin Herrick

    Lets hope so!

  • garydpdx

    As someone who has lived in 8 different cities in the US and Canada (if you include my hometown) and seen a lot of relocation by other people to both companies and universities that I was at, I would agree more with Swiss but not in such words! :)

    But seriously, Mark, look at all the senior professors who move around between universities, and corporate executives (I'm not even extreme; one VP that I'm close to, has lived in 8 different countries!). While you and other people have raised valid points on problems that can arise (e.g., spouses, locations, papers), they can and are regularly overcome. And I would agree with an earlier writer: don't go to a city that you will hate to be stuck in, if you lose your gig!

    And yes, I have been burned by insincere job applicants who went through all the trouble of going through the interview (including being flown out at company expense), and then turning down the job offer because they were reluctant to move from (e.g.) upstate New York to Chicago. (In fact, that's a major hazard today because so many mortgages are underwater and make it financially impossible to relocate.)

    Size of the company also matters. In Portland, Oregon, I know of many people cut from Intel and Lattice Semiconductor who are trying to make their way back to Silicon Valley (some originally transferred from there but don't fit in their old firms anymore, else might have tried to transfer back to avoid layoff), while it is smaller firms that are looking. Because of THAT factor, one contact has taken out a PO Box in Milpitas that a friend can check regularly, and is even willing to walk away from their Oregon mortgage in order to make the move (plus spouse also unemployed, so no strings there). Chacun a son gout …

  • garydpdx

    As someone who has lived in 8 different cities in the US and Canada (if you include my hometown) and seen a lot of relocation by other people to both companies and universities that I was at, I would agree more with Swiss but not in such words! :)

    But seriously, Mark, look at all the senior professors who move around between universities, and corporate executives (I'm not even extreme; one VP that I'm close to, has lived in 8 different countries!). While you and other people have raised valid points on problems that can arise (e.g., spouses, locations, papers), they can and are regularly overcome. And I would agree with an earlier writer: don't go to a city that you will hate to be stuck in, if you lose your gig!

    And yes, I have been burned by insincere job applicants who went through all the trouble of going through the interview (including being flown out at company expense), and then turning down the job offer because they were reluctant to move from (e.g.) upstate New York to Chicago. (In fact, that's a major hazard today because so many mortgages are underwater and make it financially impossible to relocate.)

    Size of the company also matters. In Portland, Oregon, I know of many people cut from Intel and Lattice Semiconductor who are trying to make their way back to Silicon Valley (some originally transferred from there) but don't fit in their old firms anymore (else could have transferred back to avoid layoff), while it is smaller firms that are looking. Because of THAT factor, one contact has taken out a PO Box in Milpitas that a friend can check regularly, and is even willing to walk away from their Oregon mortgage in order to make the move (plus spouse also unemployed, so no strings there). Chacun a son gout …

  • garydpdx

    The previous article by MIT Green B would be a good reference. The eight cities that I have lived in, I at least like and often love. I'm focusing on my 'loved' cities for my next opportunity, even if my current address is not there. But looking at my resume, they'll know that I had been there, once.

    The family aspect is important, I'm lucky to be in a relationship where we are both immersed in our work because we like it (lucky not once, but twice!) so getting together every 4-6 weeks is fine. Oh, did I mention that we live in different cities and time zones?

    But you don't have to be that eccentric. I have seen too many senior people leading more conventional lifestyles successfully relocate to new university and corporate positions. And most have been careful to work out the spouse and family issues beforehand. If it doesn't hit you until an offer appears, it was wrong to apply in the first place! (See above, I have been burned.)

  • garydpdx

    The previous article by MIT Green B would be a good reference. The eight cities that I have lived in, I at least like and often love. I'm focusing on my 'loved' cities for my next opportunity, even if my current address is not there. But looking at my resume, they'll know that I had been there, once.

    The family aspect is important, I'm lucky to be in a relationship where we are both immersed in our work because we like it (lucky not once, but twice!) so getting together every 4-6 weeks is fine. Oh, did I mention that we live in different cities and time zones?

    But you don't have to be that eccentric. I have seen too many senior people leading more conventional lifestyles successfully relocate to new university and corporate positions. And most have been careful to work out the spouse and family issues beforehand. If it doesn't hit you until an offer appears, it was wrong to apply in the first place! (See above, I have been burned.)

  • garydpdx

    You beat me to it, sort of. I think that it is important for all team members to spend some time together at a hub, unless you are large enough to have multiple hubs (which can be important if you're international and there are travel issues). Senior staff needs to move between hubs regularly, junior less often but visit for a few weeks or months every couple of years. I have dealt with time differences ranging from 8 to 12 hours (think west coast to UK/Ireland, then Israel/Jordan, then India/China). I reported to a manager in the UK (even years directly, odd years dotted line, thanks to constant reorgs) so we chatted 3-5 times a week while they were driving home, I had just arrived to work.

  • garydpdx

    You beat me to it, sort of. I think that it is important for all team members to spend some time together at a hub, unless you are large enough to have multiple hubs (which can be important if you're international and there are travel issues). Senior staff needs to move between hubs regularly, junior less often but visit for a few weeks or months every couple of years. I have dealt with time differences ranging from 8 to 12 hours (think west coast to UK/Ireland, then Israel/Jordan, then India/China). I reported to a manager in the UK (even years directly, odd years dotted line, thanks to constant reorgs) so we chatted 3-5 times a week while they were driving home, I had just arrived to work.

  • garydpdx

    Some VC's are flexible on location, most aren't. But the 'international' factor comes into play, even between the US and Canada.

    I have had an ex-boss who left and founded a start-up, and was forced to move coast-to-coast in the US by his sole second round VC. It was either that, or fold. He even had to cut people back east (some who left great jobs at the old firm) because the VC forced local staff upon him from one of their recently-failed start-ups.

  • garydpdx

    Some VC's are flexible on location, most aren't. But the 'international' factor comes into play, even between the US and Canada.

    I have had an ex-boss who left and founded a start-up, and was forced to move coast-to-coast in the US by his sole second round VC. It was either that, or fold. He even had to cut people back east (some who left great jobs at the old firm) because the VC forced local staff upon him from one of their recently-failed start-ups.

  • garydpdx

    PBC, I would agree that too many companies even in tech are stuck on 'old school' ideas of needing to be in one location. But the ability of a firm to operated in networked form, with limited interaction, varies and is an overlooked part of corporate culture. Being large enough to have multiple hubs, that can be done and I have worked in such firms (even having management 8 time zones away, who in turn report to senior directors one floor up from me). A smaller firm should have a hub where the team can gather and/or have senior people travel regularly (forced-fit into business trips, if needed) when staff live in places where travel is more difficult. I have seen successful distributed operations, and they do rely on the members having developed 'chemistry' usually by spending some time together, face-to-face.

  • garydpdx

    PBC, I would agree that too many companies even in tech are stuck on 'old school' ideas of needing to be in one location. But the ability of a firm to operated in networked form, with limited interaction, varies and is an overlooked part of corporate culture. Being large enough to have multiple hubs, that can be done and I have worked in such firms (even having management 8 time zones away, who in turn report to senior directors one floor up from me). A smaller firm should have a hub where the team can gather and/or have senior people travel regularly (forced-fit into business trips, if needed) when staff live in places where travel is more difficult. I have seen successful distributed operations, and they do rely on the members having developed 'chemistry' usually by spending some time together, face-to-face.

  • garydpdx

    While I have never taken a 'bridge job', I understand the concept. But it's still a job and I wouldn't take one unless it's something that I would enjoy doing and even gain from. (The majority of us on this site are probably fortunate enough to even say those last few words that I wrote. Count your blessings!)

    Myself, I'm looking at taking a full time development job (while that has recently been a part of how I spent my time) with a start-up that's running on R&D grants, if it leads to an executive position (and part time development, at most) in a few months when other funding is in pace. And of course, get it in writing! :)

  • garydpdx

    While I have never taken a 'bridge job', I understand the concept. But it's still a job and I wouldn't take one unless it's something that I would enjoy doing. (The majority of us on this site are probably fortunate enough to even say those last few words that I wrote. Count your blessings!)

  • garydpdx

    Here are some factors …

    i) you will be lacking an income.

    ii) you are not laid off but will quit, so won't be receiving unemployment benefits as bridge income.

    iii) relocation will cost, even after you factor out what you can sell (cost out your possessions versus the cost to move them; I donate or give away what I can't sell, as it's cheaper to replace at my destination).

    iv) even if living with your brother for free, that is time-limited. See (i) above.

    If you are within driving distance of Chicago, try to network remotely and go there on weekends if there are such events. Search for 'Business Network Chicago' and sign up there, if any groups or events interest you.

  • garydpdx

    Here are some factors …

    i) you will be lacking an income.

    ii) you are not laid off but will quit, so won't be receiving unemployment benefits as bridge income.

    iii) relocation will cost, even after you factor out what you can sell (cost out your possessions versus the cost to move them; I donate or give away what I can't sell, as it's cheaper to replace at my destination).

    iv) even if living with your brother for free, that is time-limited. See (i) above.

    If you are within driving distance of Chicago, try to network remotely and go there on weekends if there are such events. Search for 'Business Network Chicago' and sign up there, if any groups or events interest you.

  • garydpdx

    Yes, Daniel, but also note that 'moving there' usually does not apply between countries except within the EU (and there are still restrictions on certain combinations, for a while).

  • garydpdx

    Yes, Daniel, but also note that 'moving there' usually does not apply between countries except within the EU (and there are still restrictions on certain combinations, for a while).

  • http://www.piqqle.com/blog/ Daniel Kim

    Agreed. I should have noted that my comment on “moving there” was based on the assumption of movement between domestic US locations.

  • http://www.piqqle.com/blog/ Daniel Kim

    Agreed. I should have noted that my comment on “moving there” was based on the assumption of movement between domestic US locations.

  • Hagit Katzenelson

    Mark,
    My husband and I are moving to the Bay Area this summer. Shall I say 'moving back' as we've lived there before and moved away 9 years ago?
    I understand everything you wrote and I believe you, that is, I believe that that's how employers think.
    However, we have a family and even though we're committed to making this move happen, we cannot survive financially without at least one job. Meaning that we don't have the luxury of moving first and then taking 4-6 months until we start working. Once we have one job, the entire family will move. Period.
    Based on what you wrote, this isn't good enough. Potential employers won't even initiate a phone interview. Perhaps one of us should move and find a sublet/cheap room/sofa for a few months and then have the family move later, once he/she is employed?
    Any other ideas for persuading potential employers that we're serious?
    Thanks!

  • Hagit Katzenelson

    Mark,
    My husband and I are moving to the Bay Area this summer. Shall I say 'moving back' as we've lived there before and moved away 9 years ago?
    I understand everything you wrote and I believe you, that is, I believe that that's how employers think.
    However, we have a family and even though we're committed to making this move happen, we cannot survive financially without at least one job. Meaning that we don't have the luxury of moving first and then taking 4-6 months until we start working. Once we have one job, the entire family will move. Period.
    Based on what you wrote, this isn't good enough. Potential employers won't even initiate a phone interview. Perhaps one of us should move and find a sublet/cheap room/sofa for a few months and then have the family move later, once he/she is employed?
    Any other ideas for persuading potential employers that we're serious?
    Thanks!

  • Joe

    I agree. I want to move to the DC area. I am singler…no family and willing to do it with no relocation assistance. However, I cannot afford to just get up and move without a job lined up. I wish it were that simple.

  • Celia

    The only difficulty is… the economy isn't that great. Everyone can't just get up and move without a solid promise of getting a job. Bills won't go away unfortunately.

  • Celia

    The only difficulty is… the economy isn't that great. Everyone can't just get up and move without a solid promise of getting a job. Bills won't go away unfortunately.

  • Los Angeles hopeful

    Seriously, this is the best information I have found on the web, or anywhere for that matter (including advice of friends and loved ones). I love Los Angeles and I was trying to find a job via executive recruiters, GOOD LUCK! Recruiters have no interest whatsoever in paying any attention to you if you do are not physically able to meet a prospective employer and like the posting says, those jobs most likely are not THE job or the employer would not have to use a recruiter in the first place. The reality is Los Angeles has a reported unemployment rate of over 12 percent right now and there are hundreds of local qualified people applying for the same job you are so there is no logical reason to believe you will be “the one”. That being said, COMMIT!!! I love it!! Save your money, plan the move, do it and then make your new job title “professional job finder”!!!!

  • Los Angeles hopeful

    Seriously, this is the best information I have found on the web, or anywhere for that matter (including advice of friends and loved ones). I love Los Angeles and I was trying to find a job via executive recruiters, GOOD LUCK! Recruiters have no interest whatsoever in paying any attention to you if you do are not physically able to meet a prospective employer and like the posting says, those jobs most likely are not THE job or the employer would not have to use a recruiter in the first place. The reality is Los Angeles has a reported unemployment rate of over 12 percent right now and there are hundreds of local qualified people applying for the same job you are so there is no logical reason to believe you will be “the one”. That being said, COMMIT!!! I love it!! Save your money, plan the move, do it and then make your new job title “professional job finder”!!!!

  • Aryan B

    Mark – you have really skirted the the key issue — the practical aspect of managing the move.

    For instance, let's say I'm a senior level professional (Director/VP) and I'm looking to switch geographies (staying in the same industry and function) from NY -> SF. For the sake of simplicity, let's assume I'm single, no kids, and don't own a primary home either. Based on what you are suggesting, I should quit my current job and simply move. Are you nuts ?

    1. How do you explain the gap on the resume for your next job — the one after the one you are shooting for ? For senior positions, closing a job offer can take several months.
    2. What about your negotiation power as a jobless guy ?
    3. The risk that you may not actually find 'the job' and you may end up settling for something less ?

  • Aryan B

    Mark – you have really skirted the the key issue — the practical aspect of managing the move.

    For instance, let's say I'm a senior level professional (Director/VP) and I'm looking to switch geographies (staying in the same industry and function) from NY -> SF. For the sake of simplicity, let's assume I'm single, no kids, and don't own a primary home either. Based on what you are suggesting, I should quit my current job and simply move. Are you nuts ?

    1. How do you explain the gap on the resume for your next job — the one after the one you are shooting for ? For senior positions, closing a job offer can take several months.
    2. What about your negotiation power as a jobless guy ?
    3. The risk that you may not actually find 'the job' and you may end up settling for something less ?