How Many Times Should You Tweet Your Blog Post?

Posted on Jun 17, 2010 | 132 comments


Last September I was on a panel with Guy Kawasaki talking about Twitter.  He said at the time that he Tweeted 4 times for every story that he wrote.  FOUR TIMES!  The exact same Tweet.  I couldn’t believe it.  His rationale was that he found that his audience was tuning into Twitter at several different times during the day and he found that four was the optimal number to convert enough of the people reading his posts into traffic back to his website.

I asked him whether he was worried that he was turning off potential followers who didn’t want their streams flooded every day with Guy Kawasaki Tweets.  He argued that anybody who followed enough people wouldn’t really notice much of a difference and if they followed so few people that they were significantly flooded then they were the wrong followers for him [on this point I’ll never agree – I strive not to overwhelm any followers].  At the time I had a small enough group of people I followed that if anybody was in overdrive on posting for a day I always noticed (as I pointed out in Point 2 in this post).

I left the panel thinking that Guy was off base but realizing he had somewhat of a point.  I’ve argued previously that Twitter is a new form of curated RSS and in many ways it is.  But it is a transient RSS reader.  If you’re not logged in for a few hours and stuff passes through the pipes then it’s gone.  It’s true that there are ways to make sure you don’t miss stuff (like lists or segmenting traffic in TweetDeck) but most people don’t employ these techniques.  They just consume Twitter when they’re hungry for a conversation or some news right now.

So I started experimenting with multiple Tweets.  In particular I would schedule some Tweets (using CoTweet, which lets you schedule Tweets) to go out around 5:40am (in time for East Coast 8:40am consumption) and then again at 8:40am for West Coast time.  In fact, that is what I plan to do for this post.  I’ll finish writing around 1am and that’s a dumb time to Tweet because few people in the US are online.  Sometimes I would send a Tweet at 7pm and then again at 7.30am the next morning.  I wanted to see two things:

  • Would the second (or sometimes even third Tweet) convert enough people to my blog to make it worth potentially annoying some people on Twitter?
  • would I get a reaction from the Twitter community telling me it was too much?

I’d like to share my conclusions with you but then also ask you for feedback.  Many people reading today’s blog post would have seen it by clicking through on Twitter.  My questions for you:

  • how often do you notice my second Tweet? I’m going on the premise that on most days most users don’t notice.  Some will notice it all the time (either because you follow 70 or less people or because you’re often on Twitter)
  • how badly does it bother you when you do see a second Tweet?  Do you think to yourself, “I can understand why he’d send it twice because many people might not see the first one” or “man, is that annoying.  I wish Mark wouldn’t do that.” (I promise not to be offended by your answers – I’m trying to get a feel for the norm myself).

My conclusions

  1. If your goal is to send a Tweet that converts people to a blog post, sending more than one Tweet is recommended.  I would assert that people following you by definition are more likely to want to see content from you and therefore you’re better off sending 2 versus 1 Tweets (we’ll see from feedback on this site whether others feel the same way).  As an example you can see from my awe.sm logs a recent morning that 399 people clicked on my link on Twitter the night before at 7pm.  I send out a second Tweet at 7am and by 8:30am I already had 224 clicks.  This number often passes the first number by the end of the day.  If I sent out a third Tweet later (I didn’t) it likely would get about 50% as much as the morning one.  This means that there are still many people who haven’t seen it and would like to.

Note that these numbers only measure people who clicked on that exact link.  Many people swap out my short URL code and put in their own so I don’t capture 100% of the total clicks with the codes but if you look at the overall traffic from that morning on my blog you’ll see that my Twitter link accounts for about 15% of the morning traffic to my blog (this percentage will drop by the end of the day as more people arrive via RSS readers or referrals) and last night’s link accounted for about 10% of the daily traffic.

So my conclusion is that the second Tweet is generally worth it.  The third probably is also but I usually resist the temptation in the desire to balance “reach” with “frequency” so as not to piss people (you!) off.

2. I try not to “double Tweet” every day and I vary the time of day just to shake it up a bit.  You’ll see from this morning’s logs that my post today was featured prominently on Hacker News.  This always leads to a spike in traffic.  I could already see this by early AM so in this case I didn’t think it was worth RT’ing to get another 200 viewers through the door.

3. The smartest strategy I’ve seen is implemented by Babak Nivi over at VentureHacks.  He’ll send out multiple Tweets linking to the same story but with totally different text.  What he does is pull out specific quotes from the story and then Tweets those but linking back to the same story.  I find that this is more palatable for me than seeing the same Tweet 4 times (but has the downside of potentially driving people to your blog post that they may have already seen).

4. I also try to mix up my Tweets with a combo of  Tweets linking to my blog, Tweets making general comments like where I’m going that night and some Tweets where I ask a question to engage the audience (obviously where I generally want to know something).  I think this is important – otherwise your Twitter feed just becomes, literally, an RSS reader.

So, whaddaya think?

  • http://twitter.com/jonwjones Jonathan Jones

    1. I typically don't notice the second tweet.
    2. Two tweets doesn't bother me at all. I follow several people that interject a blog post tweet multiple times a day.

  • http://twitter.com/jonwjones Jonathan Jones

    1. I typically don't notice the second tweet.
    2. Two tweets doesn't bother me at all. I follow several people that interject a blog post tweet multiple times a day.

  • http://robjensen.info/ jensenrf

    An additional idea outside of quotes of your own blog post is to highlight the conversation in the comments and for those who has already read your post they may click back through.

    Overall I see twitter as another form of publishing and appreciate unique content. I understand its a powerful promotional tool but twitter updates should have an equal value add to your followers as to your blog traffic.

  • http://robjensen.info/ jensenrf

    An additional idea outside of quotes of your own blog post is to highlight the conversation in the comments and for those who has already read your post they may click back through.

    Overall I see twitter as another form of publishing and appreciate unique content. I understand its a powerful promotional tool but twitter updates should have an equal value add to your followers as to your blog traffic.

  • http://twitter.com/shawnkolodny Shawn Kolodny

    I have no problem with multiple tweets, doesnt bother me, I scan over them a few times a day and see what I like, if I see something again I dont click on it. As it stands I probably only click on a few percent of the tweets anyway. Keep double tweeting.

    Audiences change, there are days where I dont have time to get to twitter. You might want to try to wait a day and then retweet, or even longer, perhaps repost an oldy but a goody even a week later, see what traffic is like. Just an idea.

  • http://twitter.com/shawnkolodny Shawn Kolodny

    I have no problem with multiple tweets, doesnt bother me, I scan over them a few times a day and see what I like, if I see something again I dont click on it. As it stands I probably only click on a few percent of the tweets anyway. Keep double tweeting.

    Audiences change, there are days where I dont have time to get to twitter. You might want to try to wait a day and then retweet, or even longer, perhaps repost an oldy but a goody even a week later, see what traffic is like. Just an idea.

  • http://danreich.com danreich

    (ahh..now your blog works..no more croatian cars..nice)…

    For me, it doesn't matter how many times you tweet your blog post because I still use Google Reader for my “top tier” blogs (you are included on that list).

    I still use Google Reader to filter out quality content from the rest of the twitter-stream because as some folks state below, the noise to signal ratio is still very high (even with a hand curated set of people I follow). Starting to feel very MySpace-ish.

  • http://danreich.com danreich

    (ahh..now your blog works..no more croatian cars..nice)…

    For me, it doesn't matter how many times you tweet your blog post because I still use Google Reader for my “top tier” blogs (you are included on that list).

    I still use Google Reader to filter out quality content from the rest of the twitter-stream because as some folks state below, the noise to signal ratio is still very high (even with a hand curated set of people I follow). Starting to feel very MySpace-ish.

  • http://uniquevisitor.net Jeff Pester

    The problem I have with Nivi's strategy is that it I think I'm clicking through to a new story and then find out it's simply the same one I read earlier. The net effect over time is that I start to ignore his tweets because he's conditioning me to expect nothing new. I know it's not trickery, but each time I click through a reformatted tweet and see the same story I feel I've been had in some way.

  • http://uniquevisitor.net Jeff Pester

    The problem I have with Nivi's strategy is that I think I'm clicking through to a new story and then find out it's simply the same one I read earlier. The net effect over time is that I start to ignore his tweets because he's conditioning me to expect nothing new. I know it's not trickery, but each time I click through a reformatted tweet and see the same story I feel I've been had in some way.

    Roy, I like your idea on including a common phrase – that seems like a solid way for me to quickly process it.

  • http://cameron-schultz.ca Schultzter

    This explains what some of your other CloudAve colleagues are doing. I thought it was a bug in your blog platform or even Twitter but this makes more sense.

    Anyways, I've flipped back and forth between RSS (in GReader) and Twitter. My tendency though is to follow real friends on Twitter and follow news sources by RSS. There's a bit of cross-over – best friends Twitter feeds are in GReader as well so I don't miss anything (even if I don't participate) and some news sources are on a Twitter List (but not my main Twitter page).

  • http://cameron-schultz.ca Schultzter

    This explains what some of your other CloudAve colleagues are doing. I thought it was a bug in your blog platform or even Twitter but this makes more sense.

    Anyways, I've flipped back and forth between RSS (in GReader) and Twitter. My tendency though is to follow real friends on Twitter and follow news sources by RSS. There's a bit of cross-over – best friends Twitter feeds are in GReader as well so I don't miss anything (even if I don't participate) and some news sources are on a Twitter List (but not my main Twitter page).

  • http://twitter.com/eradke Eli Radke

    I have a trading blog that I promote through twitter. Traders are up throughout the night so I tweet when I publish around 2pm and again around 3am. I always indicate that I reposted it. Twitter is great for testing headlines, but you should not abuse your followers. I did unfollow Guy because of his constant promotions.

  • http://twitter.com/eradke Eli Radke

    I have a trading blog that I promote through twitter. Traders are up throughout the night so I tweet when I publish around 2pm and again around 3am. I always indicate that I reposted it. Twitter is great for testing headlines, but you should not abuse your followers. I did unfollow Guy because of his constant promotions.

  • http://twitter.com/iolapqat Peter Abeln

    My answer: zero. I don't follow people who tweet their own content at all. I already have an rss client, and twitter's value-add on top of that, for me at least, is to find things I didn't already know about. If I consistently find myself at a particular site, it goes into my feed reader.

    I wish the people who used twitter for self-promotion would set up separate accounts. I know I'm missing out on some interesting tweets because of my low tolerance for spam. But my time is more valuable at the margin than yet another insight or idea.

  • http://twitter.com/iolapqat Peter Abeln

    My answer: zero. I don't follow people who tweet their own content at all. I already have an rss client, and twitter's value-add on top of that, for me at least, is to find things I didn't already know about. If I consistently find myself at a particular site, it goes into my feed reader.

    I wish the people who used twitter for self-promotion would set up separate accounts. I know I'm missing out on some interesting tweets because of my low tolerance for spam. But my time is more valuable at the margin than yet another insight or idea.

  • http://www.johnexleyonline.com JohnExley

    Sure thing. I just returned from studying abroad in Singapore all semester, which was 12 hours ahead of EST. As you know, there is a growing audience of tech entrepreneurs/enthusiasts in Southeast Asia. Given the crazy time differences East/West Coast and especially overseas, I see no problem with tweeting the same article a couple times as long as you are very open about it. Add “In case you missed this earlier” etc. And just always include the post's title and same link and then we will know if we already read it or not.

    Kawasaki is very genuine about the way he uses Twitter. It is his marketing for AllTop. If people don't like that, unfollow him. As I said I don't ever visit his page on Twitter.com and typically don't click on his links once on TweetDeck, but his approach works for driving traffic to his company I think. To each his own as long as you are forthcoming and not manipulating potential readers just for the short term audience boost!

  • http://www.johnexleyonline.com JohnExley

    Sure thing. I just returned from studying abroad in Singapore all semester, which was 12 hours ahead of EST. As you know, there is a growing audience of tech entrepreneurs/enthusiasts in Southeast Asia. Given the crazy time differences East/West Coast and especially overseas, I see no problem with tweeting the same article a couple times as long as you are very open about it. Add “In case you missed this earlier” etc. And just always include the post's title and same link and then we will know if we already read it or not.

    Kawasaki is very genuine about the way he uses Twitter. It is his marketing for AllTop. If people don't like that, unfollow him. As I said I don't ever visit his page on Twitter.com and typically don't click on his links once on TweetDeck, but his approach works for driving traffic to his company I think. To each his own as long as you are forthcoming and not manipulating potential readers just for the short term audience boost!

  • http://twitter.com/gregcohn greg cohn

    Great post, but I totally agree with Peter on this. I too unsubbed from Guy K for being too verbose (as I've unsubbed from many who have low signal-to-noise ratios). I find the difference between “informing” your followers that you've got some new long-form content available and “marketing” it to them to be subtle but clear. Twitter for me remains a conversational medium. If you are marketing to me in it (unless I'm asking to be marketed to via my signing up explicitly to receive verbose notifications), you've lost my interest.

  • http://twitter.com/gregcohn greg cohn

    Great post, but I totally agree with Peter on this. I too unsubbed from Guy K for being too verbose (as I've unsubbed from many who have low signal-to-noise ratios). I find the difference between “informing” your followers that you've got some new long-form content available and “marketing” it to them to be subtle but clear. Twitter for me remains a conversational medium. If you are marketing to me in it (unless I'm asking to be marketed to via my signing up explicitly to receive verbose notifications), you've lost my interest.

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    thx. yeah, I do that from time-to-time. once a month or so I drop an old post. Mostly from when I first started blogging and nobody was reading ;-)

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    thx. yeah, I do that from time-to-time. once a month or so I drop an old post. Mostly from when I first started blogging and nobody was reading ;-)

  • http://mikeschinkel.com MikeSchinkel

    Sounds like the justification for sending multiple tweets is the same as the rationalization that email spammers use when they tell themselves that if they didn't mass email so many people then the tiny percent who would be interested would miss the message.

    Just sayin… ;-)

  • http://mikeschinkel.com MikeSchinkel

    Sounds like the justification for sending multiple tweets is the same as the rationalization that email spammers use when they tell themselves that if they didn't mass email so many people then the tiny percent who would be interested would miss the message.

    Just sayin… ;-)

  • mlewislogic

    I'd have to agree on the curated RSS comment. I love Google Reader, but I see a lot of value in Twitter for following people that have interesting thoughts and links. I realized recently that I really only tweet a few times a week, yet check it far more frequently than that just to consume.

  • http://www.CleverKoala.com Mike Lewis

    I'd have to agree on the curated RSS comment. I love Google Reader, but I see a lot of value in Twitter for following people that have interesting thoughts and links. I realized recently that I really only tweet a few times a week, yet check it far more frequently than that just to consume.

  • http://twitter.com/dcilea dcilea

    I don't notice too much redundant tweets in my stream. When I do, it is likely repeated no more than twice.

    Serendipity aside, if I saw the same tweet more than twice, it would not necessarily entice me to click through. From an art versus science perspective, I believe experimenting with different versions of the same tweet provides a nice balance (for the person posting it and recipient), as it conveys something fresh which can potentially attract attention (clicks).

  • http://twitter.com/dcilea dcilea

    I don't notice too much redundant tweets in my stream. When I do, it is likely repeated no more than twice.

    Serendipity aside, if I saw the same tweet more than twice, it would not necessarily entice me to click through. From an art versus science perspective, I believe experimenting with different versions of the same tweet provides a nice balance (for the person posting it and recipient), as it conveys something fresh which can potentially attract attention (clicks).

  • http://twitter.com/dcilea dcilea

    I don't notice too much redundant tweets in my stream. When I do, it is likely repeated no more than twice.

    Serendipity aside, if I saw the same tweet more than twice, it would not necessarily entice me to click through. From an art versus science perspective, I believe experimenting with different versions of the same tweet provides a nice balance (for the person posting as well as the recipient); it conveys something fresh which can potentially attract attention (clicks).

  • casinoman88

    I only follow a few people and have no problem with the multiple tweets. I often use the “email tweet” feature in Uber Twitter to set it up for myself when I have time. I prefer to see the same tweet, so I know it is the same post. As long it is not 5+ times per post, I do not find it obnoxious, I find it practical.

  • casinoman88

    I only follow a few people and have no problem with the multiple tweets. I often use the “email tweet” feature in Uber Twitter to set it up for myself when I have time. I prefer to see the same tweet, so I know it is the same post. As long it is not 5+ times per post, I do not find it obnoxious, I find it practical.

  • http://avc.com fredwilson

    I would never do that. It is spamming your followers. Of course guy does it. You should not not

  • http://avc.com fredwilson

    I would never do that. It is spamming your followers. Of course guy does it. You should not not

  • http://twitter.com/davidcottrell davidcottrell

    Your commenting on comments post-publish adds just as much value as the original stories. Seems there should be a way to work that into followup tweets. John mentions one way below, but if the sub-retweet could also add onto the message, you could give a reason for more people to reread the stories, in addition to bringing in people that haven't read it or missed it the first time.

    I personally don't mind you retweeting because the content is genuine, comes from you, is relatively infrequent, and is insightful. By keeping the story alive, you get more comments, which makes it even more valuable to me. I'm sure fitting the story into 140 is hard enough, and fitting it into 110 + 30 for followup would be even harder, but that would feel genuine. Thus, I'm all for you keeping it going because it also adds value to me directly.

  • http://twitter.com/davidcottrell davidcottrell

    Your commenting on comments post-publish adds just as much value as the original stories. Seems there should be a way to work that into followup tweets. John mentions one way below, but if the sub-retweet could also add onto the message, you could give a reason for more people to reread the stories, in addition to bringing in people that haven't read it or missed it the first time.

    I personally don't mind you retweeting because the content is genuine, comes from you, is relatively infrequent, and is insightful. By keeping the story alive, you get more comments, which makes it even more valuable to me. I'm sure fitting the story into 140 is hard enough, and fitting it into 110 + 30 for followup would be even harder, but that would feel genuine. Thus, I'm all for you keeping it going because it also adds value to me directly.

  • http://OpenSwipe.com Casey Allen

    I'd have to challenge that. That'd be like saying “Every time I eat sushi I feel tired afterwards. This restaurant has no business serving sushi.”

    Mark does what he thinks is best for the followers, and they vote with their fingers. There is no right or wrong here, whereas spam is a act of malice, no?

  • http://openswipe.com/ Casey Allen

    I'd have to challenge that. That'd be like saying “Every time I eat sushi I feel tired afterwards. This restaurant has no business serving sushi.”

    Mark does what he thinks is best for the followers, and they vote with their fingers. There is no right or wrong here, whereas spam is a act of malice, no?

  • http://www.matthewburgess.com/ Matthew Burgess

    I prefer to be data driven as well, but there is a lesson in quality and reputation in this as well.

    I would add to John's comments, about Kawasaki's approach in particular. He may be genuine when he speaks about how he uses Twitter, but his frequency, low value and repetition of tweets has made his name nearly synonymous with tweet spam. He clearly is using automate following software set up to build his following (although I'm sure that's not why he's following me :). The tweet content is AllTop, all day, and lacks personality.

    I'm a fan of his work and writings, but I think he's got this all wrong. But to your original query, Mark, his problem isn't repeated tweets. I think the data is on the side of repeats. You are correct that very few people will ever see the same tweet in its second or third send. His problem, rather, is that he's spammy. Your tweets are not.

    Incidentally, I handle the signal-to-noise problem with lists, set up as columns in TweetDeck. You're in one of my lists that is following only 25 people. So I might see one of your repeats, but it's still quite unlikely. Even if I do, no big deal.

  • http://www.matthewburgess.com/ Matthew Burgess

    I prefer to be data driven as well, but there is a lesson in quality and reputation in this as well.

    I would add to John's comments, about Kawasaki's approach in particular. He may be genuine when he speaks about how he uses Twitter, but his frequency, low value and repetition of tweets has made his name nearly synonymous with tweet spam. He clearly is using automate following software set up to build his following (although I'm sure that's not why he's following me :). The tweet content is AllTop, all day, and lacks personality.

    I'm a fan of his work and writings, but I think he's got this all wrong. But to your original query, Mark, his problem isn't repeated tweets. I think the data is on the side of repeats. You are correct that very few people will ever see the same tweet in its second or third send. His problem, rather, is that he's spammy. Your tweets are not.

    Incidentally, I handle the signal-to-noise problem with lists, set up as columns in TweetDeck. You're in one of my lists that is following only 25 people. So I might see one of your repeats, but it's still quite unlikely. Even if I do, no big deal.

  • http://www.matthewburgess.com/ Matthew Burgess

    Me too. I was tempted to mark his user as spam, but somehow that seemed like begging for lightning from the gods of marketing and entrepreneurship.

  • http://www.matthewburgess.com/ Matthew Burgess

    Me too. I was tempted to mark his user as spam, but somehow that seemed like begging for lightning from the gods of marketing and entrepreneurship.

  • http://venturehacks.com nivi

    That's a very nice thing to say sir. There isn't a lot of thought that goes into my strategy. I started tweeting to share quotes, not links. So if I like a quote, I'll tweet it, even if I've already linked to the post. These days I use it to share links and quotes. By the way, I dug up my first tweet:

    “You never ask board members what they think. You tell them what you're going to do.” – Bill Watkins, CEO of Seagate

  • http://venturehacks.com nivi

    That's a very nice thing to say sir. There isn't a lot of thought that goes into my strategy. I started tweeting to share quotes, not links. So if I like a quote, I'll tweet it, even if I've already linked to the post. These days I use it to share links and quotes. By the way, I dug up my first tweet:

    “You never ask board members what they think. You tell them what you're going to do.” – Bill Watkins, CEO of Seagate

  • Paddu G

    Mark, while your experiment is about tweeting multiple times, I received the second email this morning (obviously I have subscribed via email). Are your tweets trigger emails too?

  • Paddu G

    Mark, while your experiment is about tweeting multiple times, I received the second email this morning (obviously I have subscribed via email). Are your tweets trigger emails too?

  • http://cameron-schultz.ca Schultzter

    Twitter needs a function – on the push side and the pull side – to bubble up tweets.

    I have to set “day” and “night” on my side and identify people I'm following that I want to have bubble up in the “morning.” On your side you need to identify posts that should be bubbled up (if you set them all to bubble up they better all be good or you'll get unsubbed).

    It's not just a coast vs coast issue; people work nights, check their Twitter only in the evening, or from their mobile while commuting, etc.

  • http://cameron-schultz.ca Schultzter

    Twitter needs a function – on the push side and the pull side – to bubble up tweets.

    I have to set “day” and “night” on my side and identify people I'm following that I want to have bubble up in the “morning.” On your side you need to identify posts that should be bubbled up (if you set them all to bubble up they better all be good or you'll get unsubbed).

    It's not just a coast vs coast issue; people work nights, check their Twitter only in the evening, or from their mobile while commuting, etc.

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    Hey, Fred. I certainly understand where you're coming from. But I see it as more complex than that. Here are some thoughts:
    - Twitter is transient. Often people who don't see Tweets miss them forever
    - So the time zone thing really affects traffic as I outlined in my graphs. I see this every time I post.
    - I presume if I get the same amount of clicks for the second Tweet (different time zone) people missed the first one and still want to read the story
    - I know the argument that if the story is interesting it will get picked up in the RTs. Partially true. But the people who follow me may not be following people who RT
    - Another argument is that read “fans” will follow you on RSS or email newsletter. Again, partially true. When I blogged in 2005-2007 (before Salesforce.com made me stop) everybody subscribed to RSS because there was no other good way of following blogs & news. Less people sign up today because many people figure they'll see the interesting articles on Twitter. So if you started a blog many years ago your RSS count will be much higher than if you start today.
    - My current practice is 1 Tweet for articles that start to catch fire (say on Hacker News) and 2 for others where I try to drive different time zones so that people don't feel spammed (e.g. 9pm PT when it is 12am ET and those people less likely on Twitter).
    - Yes, I avoid Guy's spam process of 3-4 with every Tweet. I like Guy, but I just can't follow him on Twitter

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    Hey, Fred. I certainly understand where you're coming from. But I see it as more complex than that. Here are some thoughts:
    - Twitter is transient. Often people who don't see Tweets miss them forever
    - So the time zone thing really affects traffic as I outlined in my graphs. I see this every time I post.
    - I presume if I get the same amount of clicks for the second Tweet (different time zone) people missed the first one and still want to read the story
    - I know the argument that if the story is interesting it will get picked up in the RTs. Partially true. But the people who follow me may not be following people who RT
    - Another argument is that real “fans” will follow you on RSS or email newsletter. Again, partially true. When I blogged in 2005-2007 (before Salesforce.com made me stop) everybody subscribed to RSS because there was no other good way of following blogs & news. Less people sign up today because many people figure they'll see the interesting articles on Twitter. So if you started a blog many years ago your RSS count will be much higher than if you start today.
    - My current practice is 1 Tweet for articles that start to catch fire (say on Hacker News) and 2 for others where I try to drive different time zones so that people don't feel spammed (e.g. 9pm PT when it is 12am ET and those people less likely on Twitter).
    - Yes, I avoid Guy's spam process of 3-4 with every Tweet. I like Guy, but I just can't follow him on Twitter

  • http://bothsidesofthetable.com msuster

    Fair point. I'll definitely take that into consideration.