What Every Entrepreneur Could Learn from Justin Bieber

Posted on Mar 1, 2011 | 139 comments


This article originally appeared on TechCrunch.

I know what you’re thinking – link bait title, right? Wrong. I will stand 100% behind my assertions in this post. Justin Bieber is unbelievably entrepreneurial and most of you will never know it because he serves a target demo that doesn’t include you.

I promise you can learn from him and this movie.  I’m also betting that in 10 years he’ll be a mainstream talent rather than a pre-teen girl wonder. Read on …

On Sunday I took my 8-year-old son for a manly outing at the batting cages with his baseball team. I went in to get tokens and he got beaned by the effing first pitch while I was away.

With my son on the DL list, I offered him a movie. He asked to see the new Justin Bieber movie, “Never Say Never.” I was initially skeptical, but it was a pure delight for me from start to finish. And it was a great lesson to talk about with my son afterward. Justin Bieber is a self-made entrepreneurial success.

No, it’s not lost on my the amount of crap I’m going to get for saying that I loved the movie. But give me a story of a kid from a non-privileged background and single mother who makes it big through natural talent plus tons of hard work and a belief that he can do it despite everybody telling him he can’t and I’ll watch that film all day long.

For the same reason I loved the much more flawed story of Anvil, who interestingly came from Toronto, about 100 miles away from where Justin Bieber grew up.

With my son we were able to talk afterward about how hard Justin worked to achieve his dream. You always imagine these child stars are going to have things handed to them on a plate. We were able to talk about having dreams, working hard, never accepting people telling you that you can’t do something. That is what this film is about.

It’s about “Never Say Never.” He was told he’d never have a big following. He was told he’d never be able to play on radio let alone Madison Square Garden. He sold out MSG in 22 minutes. Jaden Pinkett Smith (son of Will Smith) rode on Justin’s coattails in his opening act at MSG – not the other way around.

Here’s what you could learn from the movie:

1. It all has to start from talent
The movie shows Justin Bieber’s musical talents from the age of two years old. If you don’t believe me he was born with talent, check out this 7 second video of his rhythm from age 3. To be a great entrepreneur you really do need talent. You need to be great at something: technology back-end, front-end design, usability, sales, marketing, quantitative analysis, leadership –> whatever.

But if you’re not uber talented there is always a “Justin Bieber of technology” waiting to kick your ass. Think Zuckerberg: Born with innate talent at the keyboard. Think  of the UX team at Mint.com – they have led an entire generation to say, “I’m the Mint.com of …”

These things don’t happen by accident.  Either you’re uber talented or join somebody who is.

2. If you’re different the “normal channels” of success will tell you “no”
Justin Bieber was discovered by Scooter Braun who saw him on YouTube. The story of Scooter itself is a beautiful lesson learned. He was immediately struck by Justin’s talent and was relentless in convincing Justin’s mom to come to Atlanta to meet him & other local talent. Scooter went the extra mile, didn’t take no for an answer and even fronted all of Justin’s costs to get him to come to Atlanta. Think of Scooter as Justin’s angel investor.

Justin then had a meeting with Usher where he sang him a song he himself had recorded. Usher agreed to back Justin immediately and worked hard to convince Justin not to sign with Justin Timberlake (where they already had a meeting set up) or anybody else. Usher worked hard to set up meetings (including L.A. Reid, who originally signed Kanye West, Mariah Carey, Pink, Avril Levigne and others)  for Justin Bieber even before he was committed to Usher and this hard work and commitment is what persuaded Bieber to go with Usher.

Consider Usher a hard-working early-stage VC. And he has acted as a personal mentor for Justin ever since. Justin was going through the ride that Usher himself had been through when he was younger. It’s that sort of mentorship experience that drives many of us hands-on VCs.

3. You have to get your ass out there and prove yourself
So with two major talents competing over him and having signed with Usher his path was set – right? Wrong. None of the major labels wanted to pick him up and none of the local radio stations wanted to play his music. They told him that he had do go through Disney or Nickelodeon like Miley Cyrus or Miranda Cosgrove. They said his music wouldn’t have mass appeal.

So they set out a grass route’s effort to go directly to the market. Bieber went across the entire country in a bus and on an airplane to meet with every DJ in the country whether they would play him or not. He was so charming – and musically talented – the DJs and listeners loved him instantly. He would take requests from callers and play live sessions in each city. DJ’s couldn’t help but want to play his records.

4. You have to build a product that people really love
There has been all sorts of discussions about marketing on blogs lately. My favorite is by Rand Fishkin and is here and others by Fred Wilson (here) and Brad Feld (here, who if he’s reading this just threw up a little in him mouth ;-) – all are worthwhile.

Let me say this – whether you believe in marketing at startups or not, I think we’d all agree that you can’t have a great marketing program around a mediocre product. You need to start with an amazing product and no amazing product is built without talent. Watch the movie – you’ll see what I mean.

It also helps to start with a target demographic so you can focus your efforts. As you know, Justin’s is 8-15 year-old girls and he built his music & persona around this demo. You should start by getting out and talking directly with customers as Bieber did. To the extent that you’re initially “marketing” it is really just evangalizing yourself, meeting key influencers, meeting customers, taking feedback, refining your product and winning people over.

Only after you’ve done all this can you consider whether or not it makes sense to pay for any marketing such as SEM, PR, trade show expenditure, etc.

5. You can appeal to your audience directly and build support
Bieber Tweeted constantly when he would be at a radio station. Girls started appearing to get his autograph. At first it was 10-20 girls, then 40, then 80 then he started getting malls shut down due to safety concerns of local police. He mastered the art of going direct to his audience via Twitter. This is what Fred Wilson talks about in this post about the FourSquare founders.

Foursquare is a great example of this. You can laugh at Dennis and Naveen doing fashion shoots but think about how many new users they got for doing that. It was a stunt like any other stunt they’ve done. And they have done hundreds of them. The media eats it up as they always need something to write about.

Be unique, find free marketing opportunities and use social media to build your following.

Bieber also uploaded all of his stuff on to YouTube. So while the traditional system told him there was no audience for him he had gone direct to his audience and proved them wrong. There’s nothing like having YouTube fans to prove to labels that you can sell music.

6. Engage with your audience
One of the most important and most misunderstood rules of our new open & social media is that you need to engage directly with your audience. I know that I’m not always perfect on email because the volume is so high and it has become such a chore. But I do try to get through as many as I can and hope the ones that slip through the crack are persistent.

But when I write a blog post I always allocate a certain amount of time to having debates in the comments section. When I send things on Twitter I always do my best to respond to many of the people who @ message me. I can’t do all of them all of the time, but you’d be surprised how often I ping random people who write me. Even if it is just to say, “thank you for your note.”

I think nothing is worse on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube or blogs than being one-directional. That’s broadcast not new media. Justin? He knew this. Watch this heart-warming short video from the Jimmy Kimmel show. You might think it’s a stunt but when you watch the movie you get the sense that Justin (and his team) really do want to engage with their audience.

7. Give back
Finally, Bieber and his team will teach you to “give back.” They go out before each show and give a handful of free tickets to seats near the front of the stage to fans who look needy and who have waited in line for a long time. I’m a big believer in giving back. It’s part of what you do as a person who has received a leg-up from somebody else. Bieber & Co. seem sincere in this effort. I am, too. As an entrepreneur getting traction, whose life are you going to change?

Go Watch the Movie
It’s a wonderful film filled with truly inspirational stories that should get the hairs on the back of any aspiring entrepreneur to stand on end. I know that you’re too cool to admit you’d see a Justin Bieber film. I know I had never heard any of his music before. But don’t worry – just grab your nearest niece or nephew and tell your friends that you only went because you wanted to be a good uncle or aunt.

I promise, you won’t regret it.

(and let the character assaults from those who haven’t even seen the film start …. wait …. now)

  • http://twitter.com/iCrowdApps Ted Kao

    I get the point, its like the dancing kid on youtube, Lil Demon. The now 8 year old hawaiian kid who got discovered by LXD via his youtube video (which is where Beiber was also discovered). Couldn’t stop checking out his videos when I first found them. Talent is talent. There are so many rags to riches stories like these kids from nearly all of history but now the platform to expose your talents are that much greater. Good food for thought for us and will share with our team. Thanks.

  • http://www.thewebcitizen.com Thewebcitizen.com

    Excellent post Mark, it pretty much sums up on what it needs to succeed.

  • http://keisimone.myopenid.com/ kimsia

    You have just convinced me to go find this movie.

    That is no small feat.

  • Hamilton Chan

    Loved the post. Maybe would add 1 other missing ingredient, though: #8 Luck. I guess it goes without saying, but like anything else in life, luck does play a factor. You make your own luck to a large degree, but sometimes, things need to swing your way without your direct involvement. Just my two cents!

  • http://www.brekiri.com/ Greg4

    Wow, Mark, I’m impressed by how you bring all the usual excellent analysis and with a pre-teen pop music example to boot.

    It’d be interesting to know how much talent gets discovered on YouTube versus the traditional channels these days. It’s obviously swinging that way. I also wonder if and when a similar channel will appear for tech entrepreneurs. Angel List is probably the closest, but still not that close. It’s a shame that often the work required to raise money is so orthogonal to the work required to build a company.

  • http://pupeno.com J. Pablo Fernández

    You convinced me, I’ll added to my list of movies to watch. I’m sure my wife will enjoy it (she’s a musician).

  • http://hirethoughts.blogspot.com Donna Brewington White

    Mark, this is a remarkable post.

    I went to the theatre a skeptic and left very impressed with the Justin Bieber team and the kid himself. You are right — the film was inspiring and I’d say even encouraging. And actually a lot of fun.

    What you’ve laid out here fit with some of the things that struck me during the film, although certainly not as well-thought out as what you’ve presented. Solid example of the challenges and opportunities faced by the entrepreneur — or for that matter anyone with a dream — especially when playing against the odds.

    This is the second time I’ve seen you present a musical artist as an entrepreneur. As more popular artists become entrepreneurs this creates more accessible entrepreneurial role models for our kids — and new packaging. That’s fantastic.

    I wonder if the influence of technology in entertainment has anything to do with what seems to be more artists merging with the entrepreneurial world. Perhaps, a bit of disruption happening in entertainment as well.

  • http://twitter.com/iCrowdApps Ted Kao

    I get the point, its like the dancing kid on youtube, Lil Demon. The now 8 year old hawaiian kid who got discovered by LXD via his youtube video (which is where Beiber was also discovered). Couldn't stop checking out his videos when I first found them. Talent is talent. There are so many rags to riches stories like these kids from nearly all of history but now the platform to expose your talents are that much greater. Good food for thought for us and will share with our team. Thanks.

  • http://www.thewebcitizen.com Thewebcitizen.com

    Excellent post Mark, it pretty much sums up on what it needs to succeed.

  • http://keisimone.myopenid.com/ kimsia

    You have just convinced me to go find this movie.

    That is no small feat.

  • Hamilton Chan

    Loved the post. Maybe would add 1 other missing ingredient, though: #8 Luck. I guess it goes without saying, but like anything else in life, luck does play a factor. You make your own luck to a large degree, but sometimes, things need to swing your way without your direct involvement. Just my two cents!

  • http://twitter.com/rrohan189 rrohan189

    Very interesting. I have been very impressed by his PR – recently, he came up with a witty tweet after his account had been hacked.

    Should check out the movie!

  • http://www.brekiri.com/ Greg4

    Wow, Mark, I'm impressed by how you bring all the usual excellent analysis and with a pre-teen pop music example to boot.

    It'd be interesting to know how much talent gets discovered on YouTube versus the traditional channels these days. It's obviously swinging that way. I also wonder if and when a similar channel will appear for tech entrepreneurs. Angel List is probably the closest, but still not that close. It's a shame that often the work required to raise money is so orthogonal to the work required to build a company.

  • http://twitter.com/Sirachm Sirach Mendes

    lol….i did read this yesterday. Very funny comparision
    But It makes sense.
    One thing i dont get is why do people hate the guy – i mean hes just a kid who is famous and living out a great lifestyle (according to media reports)

    Its alot to do with envy and jealousy i feel (the grapes are sour complex )

  • http://twitter.com/Cynicalgrinch Pawel

    You almost had me convinced to go watch it, almost. Good summation of the history of his success though.

  • http://ordinarystrangeness.com/ holladown

    >>>>But give me a story of a kid from a non-privileged background and single mother who makes it big through natural talent plus tons of hard work and a belief that he can do it despite everybody telling him he can’t and I’ll watch that film all day long.

    So you’ve watched Eminem’s movie too? :) Great blog post.

  • http://www.tagbento.com/ @stephenhau

    It’s just too easy to knock Justin Bieber – or the Spice Girls, or Rick Astley – or anyone you see as a manufactured pop act. I’ve been guilty of that too (just yesterday, even!). This reminds me of your post on the qualities that make an entrepreneur, and is a sure reminder that we shouldn’t be so quick to knock the success of others.
    Lesson learnt!

  • http://pupeno.com J. Pablo Fernández

    You convinced me, I'll added to my list of movies to watch. I'm sure my wife will enjoy it (she's a musician).

  • http://www.davidblerner.com davidblerner

    terrific post Mark. I think your #1, (it all has to start from talent), is perhaps the most overlooked factor in people’s analysis of what makes someone successful (although someone still has to explain the Anne Hathaway phenomenon to me or at least why they asked her to host the Oscars- still scratching my head on that one)…. but to continue- sometimes I notice when reading the biography of a great artist or writer or political figure this essential core (the person’s innate talent) gets left out of the picture somehow… another example is how some non-blogging vc buddies of mine think that just because a guy like you and a couple of others simply started blogging you magically acquired a significant following… I end up having to make the point to them- “no dude- the guy can flat-out write”…
    anyway- sounds like we’ll have to order this on netflix when it’s available… txs

  • http://www.horsepigcow.com missrogue

    Wow. Now I have to go see the Justin Bieber movie.

  • http://www.horsepigcow.com missrogue

    @Hamilton

    I’m a big believer in making your own luck. And luck doesn’t come from someone who idly sits around and waits. It comes from putting yourself out there in all of the ways that Mark describes above. So is it luck? (in fact, there is a great study on ‘The Luck Factor’ over here: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/3304496/Be-lucky-its-an-easy-skill-to-learn.html)

  • http://www.eqentia.com William Mougayar

    Of course Bieber is a great startup entrepreneur! Whoever is advising this kid (and not just Usher from a music perspective) is brilliant.
    Bieber also has over 20 million Twitter followers and 8 million on Facebook which is the highest anyone has achieved I think. I read some of his tweets and they were engaging and well articulated.

    The other interesting thing is that Justin Bieber has used this movie to primarily show some of his critics that his success was the result of his talent and hard work, and not luck and promotion. Contrast with The Social Network where Zuckerberg totally dissed that movie and didn’t work with its producers, so the result was inaccurate or fuzzy renditions of the real Facebook story.

  • http://www.fiftybyfifty.com/lifeoffarhan/ Farhan Lalji

    Thanks for this Mark.

    While the entrepreneurial lessons are great, I think the life lessons for kids are equally if not more important. One of the constant questions my wife and I are asking ourselves is how to make sure our kids don’t coast knowing that we can pay for a lot of things. I’d be interested to hear more about the conversation with your son and how you work to instill a solid work ethic in your children?

  • Anonymous

    If VC doesn’t work out, given the amount of material you’ve given to Techcrunch lately I’m guessing that they will have a spot as a regular columnist for you, Mark. :)

    I think it was a great article and I’m sure the movie was excellent.

  • Kullar

    ffs we’ll go watch it on friday before dinner in young cheng. Just won’t tell anyone at the dinner table

  • http://hirethoughts.blogspot.com Donna Brewington White

    Good comparison, William. Also, shows different approaches to marketing, wouldn’t you say?

  • Susterfan

    Bwahahaha JUSTIN BIEBER?! Really Mark?

    Haha just kidding. You successfully massaged it into a great post about the parallels with tech entrepreneurs.

    Btw next time be more careful with your kid. ;p

  • http://hirethoughts.blogspot.com Donna Brewington White

    Mark, this is a remarkable post.

    I went to the theatre a skeptic and left very impressed with the Justin Bieber team and the kid himself. You are right — the film was inspiring and I'd say even encouraging — probably more so for me than for my kids. And it was actually a lot of fun.

    What you've laid out here are some of the things that struck me during the film, although certainly not as well-thought out as what you've presented. For someone with eyes to see, it is a solid example of the types of challenges and opportunities faced by the entrepreneur — or for that matter anyone with a dream — particularly if that dream doesn't match with precedent.

    This is the second time I've seen you draw parallels between a musical artist and the entrepreneurial world. As more artists become entrepreneurs this creates more accessible entrepreneurial role models for our kids — and new packaging. That's fantastic.

    Interesting how the artists of today are merging with the entrepreneurial world more than ever before it seems. I wonder if the influence of technology in entertainment has anything to do with this? Certainly technology is creating disruption in that arena.

    (As a side note, I recently saw the Mixergy interview with you. It was very refreshing and I came away from that interview with some of the same sense of inspiration and encouragement to be willing to dare. )

  • llboyd

    thanks – your post is the first thing i’ve decided to read about Bieber and his background. i didn’t know anything about this kid until now – oustide of the fact that I hear his name daily. and i have some respect for him now.

    the randomness of the universe smiled on you that day. however, do you think Bieber would have “gone to see a movie” after getting “hit by one pitch”? tell that boy to cowboy up and get back on that horse.

  • http://blog.tumbledesign.com/ Nicky Hajal

    I think the channel for tech entrepreneurs is the Internet as a whole. It used to be that unaffiliated musical artists had no way to distribute their work and that’s the gap YouTube fills.

    The barrier to entry for a group of developers to build a product and grow an audience is extremely low, assuming they have talent and the other qualities mentioned in the article.

  • http://twitter.com/visualmink Miisa Mink

    Fantastic post! Thank you. I’m constantly in search of good stories like this, it really summarises all the steps one needs to take. However, the ‘either you have it or join someone who does’ was a high light. And what comes to Justin, I guess he kicks ass (as you described) but his branding sucks. I wish people would pay more attention also to their branding to build long lasting equity.

  • http://twitter.com/rrohan189 rrohan189

    Very interesting. I have been very impressed by his PR – recently, he came up with a witty tweet after his account had been hacked.

    Should check out the movie!

  • http://twitter.com/Sirachm Sirach Mendes

    lol….i did read this yesterday. Very funny comparision
    But It makes sense.
    One thing i dont get is why do people hate the guy – i mean hes just a kid who is famous and living out a great lifestyle (according to media reports)

    Its alot to do with envy and jealousy i feel (the grapes are sour complex )

  • http://twitter.com/Cynicalgrinch Pawel

    You almost had me convinced to go watch it, almost. Good summation of the history of his success though.

  • http://ordinarystrangeness.com/ holladown

    >>>>But give me a story of a kid from a non-privileged background and single mother who makes it big through natural talent plus tons of hard work and a belief that he can do it despite everybody telling him he can’t and I’ll watch that film all day long.

    So you've watched Eminem's movie too? :) Great blog post.

  • http://www.tagbento.com/ @stephenhau

    It's just too easy to knock Justin Bieber – or the Spice Girls, or Rick Astley – or anyone you see as a manufactured pop act. I've been guilty of that too (just yesterday, even!). This reminds me of your post on the qualities that make an entrepreneur, and is a sure reminder that we shouldn't be so quick to knock the success of others.
    Lesson learnt!

  • http://www.davidblerner.com davidblerner

    terrific post Mark. I think your #1, (it all has to start from talent), is perhaps the most overlooked factor in people's analysis of what makes someone successful (although someone still has to explain the Anne Hathaway phenomenon to me or at least why they asked her to host the Oscars- still scratching my head on that one)…. but to continue- sometimes I notice when reading the biography of a great artist or writer or political figure this essential core (the person's innate talent) gets left out of the picture somehow… another example is how some non-blogging vc buddies of mine think that just because a guy like you and a couple of others simply started blogging you magically acquired a significant following… I end up having to make the point to them- “no dude- the guy can flat-out write”…
    anyway- sounds like we'll have to order this on netflix when it's available… txs

  • Anonymous

    Up until a couple weeks ago, I had no idea what the Bieber phenomenon was all about and certainly wasn’t interested in finding out. Then I watched a video of a radio interview he gave (link below) where the ringtone on his phone was a famous, hilarious sports coach rant and then I subsequently got the same ring tone for my phone. I had no plans to check out the movie but after your fantastic post Mark, I can’t believe I’m now actually looking forward to seeing it. Well done!

    http://www.sbnation.com/ncaa-football/2011/2/13/1991931/justin-bieber-ringtone-mike-gundy-im-a-man-rant

  • http://technbiz.blogspot.com paramendra

    I read this on TechCrunch. I did not realize then you were the author. Great article.

  • http://www.brekiri.com/ Greg4

    Yes and no. It has gotten a lot easier, but the vast majority of products still take time, sweat, and tweaking to get traction. For example, Twitter took about nine months from launch to show much traction. Talent doesn’t necessarily pay the bills for a year or more. So I still think there’s a bottleneck in the market.

  • http://www.horsepigcow.com missrogue

    Wow. Now I have to go see the Justin Bieber movie.

  • http://www.horsepigcow.com missrogue

    @Hamilton

    I'm a big believer in making your own luck. And luck doesn't come from someone who idly sits around and waits. It comes from putting yourself out there in all of the ways that Mark describes above. So is it luck? (in fact, there is a great study on 'The Luck Factor' over here: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/tec…)

  • http://twitter.com/rkillgo Russell Killgo

    Anne Hathaway was good on the Oscars as opposed to James Franco, who was a non-engaging stiff. Talent definitely is essential. You won’t make it very far without it, but talent will only carry you so far. Asside from her acting talents and being an attractive woman in Hollywood, she is likeable. This is where she stands out among her peers. This is what took Justin Bieber to the top of the “teen scene”. Talent will get you in the door, what you do once inside is what separates the haves from the have nots. At the end of the Oscars while all the , winners were on stage with the children’s choir at the closing credits, all of her peers that were just celebrated as the best in their business were standing around waiting for the show to finish, and Anne was high-fiving all the kids around her. She didn’t have to engage with these kids that she didn’t know. Justin Bieber and Anne Hathaway’s talent got them in the door, but their ability to be engaging has taken them to the top of their fields.

    This ability to be so engaging and likeable is not something that everyone is great at. But I think it is something that people who are not good at it should strive to get better at. If multiple VC’s come away from meetings with you thinking “This guy has a decent product, but I just don’t think they have the “it” factor to take it to the top” they are much less likely to invest in your company.

  • http://www.eqentia.com William Mougayar

    Of course Bieber is a great startup entrepreneur! Whoever is advising this kid (and not just Usher from a music perspective) is brilliant.
    Bieber also has over 20 million Twitter followers and 8 million on Facebook which is the highest anyone has achieved I think. I read some of his tweets and they were engaging and well articulated.

    The other interesting thing is that Justin Bieber has used this movie to primarily show some of his critics that his success was the result of his talent and hard work, and not luck and promotion. Contrast with The Social Network where Zuckerberg totally dissed that movie and didn't work with its producers, so the result was inaccurate or fuzzy renditions of the real Facebook story.

  • http://twitter.com/rkillgo Russell Killgo

    Mark, great post. My 8 year old son is a mini-Bieber. I totally agree with your talent and hard work ideas. Talent will only take you so far though. Justin and his advisors knew this and made sure he was also very engaging with all of his fans, especially in the beginning. He has a likeability factor that I think can be a very good learning point for a lot of entrepreneurs. If this is not a strong suit of yours, then you should strive to be better at it. I believe that this likeability factor and able to be engaging is what separates the entrepreneur haves and have nots. This is one of the main reasons I chose the person I did to be my co-founder and CFO. She is a social butterfly and is totally engaging in any conversation she is having with anyone. I’m not naive enough to think that talent alone will lead me to the top of this mountain. For a startup to make it off the ground floor and go all the way to the top, the people associated with it need to have the “it” factor that will make people believe in them and be willing to follow them through any tough times.

  • http://www.fiftybyfifty.com/lifeoffarhan/ Farhan Lalji

    Thanks for this Mark.

    While the entrepreneurial lessons are great, I think the life lessons for kids are equally if not more important. One of the constant questions my wife and I are asking ourselves is how to make sure our kids don't coast knowing that we can pay for a lot of things. I'd be interested to hear more about the conversation with your son and how you work to instill a solid work ethic in your children?

  • Kylepearson

    If VC doesn't work out, given the amount of material you've given to Techcrunch lately I'm guessing that they will have a spot as a regular columnist for you, Mark. :)

    I think it was a great article and I'm sure the movie was excellent.

  • Kullar

    ffs we'll go watch it on friday before dinner in young cheng. Just won't tell anyone at the dinner table

  • http://hirethoughts.blogspot.com Donna Brewington White

    Good comparison, William. Also, shows different approaches to marketing, wouldn't you say?

  • Susterfan

    Bwahahaha JUSTIN BIEBER?! Really Mark?

    Haha just kidding. You successfully massaged it into a great post about the parallels with tech entrepreneurs.

    Btw next time be more careful with your kid. ;p