VC Industry


In my recent post “Why Am I So Lucky? Why You Need to Be Sure You’re Not the Sucker” I talked about how VCs (or other investors) get deals sent to them and how to interpret a referral.

I tried to make a simple point: People have motives when they send you a deal. Sometimes those motives are positive (they really want the chance to work with you, they think you have unique skills) and sometimes they are less positive (their first-tier of “go to” referrals passed on the deal, they don’t want to write another check themselves, etc.).

As I said in the post, I really appreciate referrals and I take meetings introduced to me from a wide variety of people. I simply wanted to make the point that if a deal referral seems “too good to be true” it probably is. If the deal is from out of your geography and/or out of your focus area or a deal is being referred by a well-know investor who normally co-invests with similar syndicates – at least ask yourself, “Why am I so lucky to be getting this call.”

Finally, I mentioned the case of an angel investor friend of mine who had a very senior industry professional contact him on LinkedIn to try and raise $500,000. My friend is very accomplished (much more than I) but he is relatively unknown in certain tech & digital media crowds. I advised him to start that conversation with a bit of skepticism.

Many people understood this thesis but some took it to mean more than I had intended. What I didn’t say was I was looking for my deals to all come through well-known investors, be “club deals,” or have positive signals.

In fact, I have a long history of saying the opposite.

I wrote here about the

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By now you will likely have read Andy Dunn’s scathing post about Venture Capitalists in which he decries the industry’s masses.

I read Andy’s post with a knowing smile on my face. After all, I am no stranger to publicly expressing the frustrations of dealing with the downside of this industry as I wrote about in 2006 when I was an entrepreneur.

But VC is like congress. It’s easy to hate it en masse yet many people love their local congressman.

Why?

Because they know him or her. They see how hard she does her job. They know her personally and know she cares about her constituencies even if she has to make tough trade-offs from time-to-time.

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Early today I gave a keynote at the VCJ Venture Alpha conference here in San Francisco. I was asked to speak about the topic of “what is going on in the venture capital world and what is the next big thing after social networking?”

// Future of VC Internet

Tough topic, but what the heck?

Next week I promised to follow up on PE Hub, one of the main journals VCs read about our industry, with a detail description of some specifics that are happening. Watch out for that – I will have a lot more details.

I’ve listed some great VCs in the presentation. I’ve left off many great ones. It isn’t intentional. You can’t cover everybody in a prezzo. Please don’t read anything into that. Some of the big ones I left off was Tim Connors of PivotNorth and Aydin Senkut of Felicis Ventures.

And all feedback welcome! See you in the comments.

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This article was originally published on TechCrunch.

Venture Capitalists typically have partners’ meetings on Mondays. Why is that? Who knows. But probably because as a group we travel a lot. So the industry formed around a day of the week when all partners could avoid having company board meetings or traveling.

Yesterday was a Monday. And not a pleasant one.

Rewind. When I first got into the industry it was 2007. Valuations were enormous relative to progress in companies. Web 2.0 was still a term being bandied about. Companies with less than $2 million in revenue were asking for $50-60 million valuations and getting them. My partnership was pretty bearish and scratched our heads a bit at price tags.

It was a great learning time for me.

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Today I’m announcing that GRP Partners is doubling down on the Twitter ecosystem by investing in DataSift, a company who provides a real-time data platform and tools to third-party developers and corporations.

Our goal is to make the enormous volume of real-time information more manageable for the 99% of companies that lack the infrastructure to process these volumes in real time. Think of DataSift as turning the fire-hose into a cost-effective and manageable tap of running water. Or in utility speak, they are transmission and we are last-mile distribution.

And better yet, the company has a product that will turn the stream into a lake. What does that mean? The Twitter stream like most others is ephemeral. If you don’t bottle it as it passes by you it’s gone. DataSift has a product that builds a permanent database for you of just the information you want to capture.

Finally, DataSift has an enormous about of historical data already stored we we can help you go back and retrieve some older data for analytical purposes.

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This is the final part of a 3-part series on the major changes in the structure of the software & the venture capital industries.

The series started here if you want to read from the start.

Or the Cliff Note’s version:

Open Source & Cloud Computing (led by Amazon) drove down tech startup costs by 90%
The result was a massive increase in startups & a whole group of new funding sources: both angels & “micro VCs”
With more competition in early-stage many VCs are investing smaller amounts at earlier stages. Some are going later stage to not miss out on hot deals. I call this “stage drift.”
The opportunities for tech startups today are more immense than they’ve ever been with billions of people now connected to the Internet nearly all the time.

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