Both Sides of the Table


Update: Bothsides TV is now available on iTunes, Soundcloud, Stitcher, or any RSS podcast player you use, and don’t forget to subscribe on YouTube. I also added a little Soundcloud widget on the sidebar (if you’re viewing on web – not on mobile or  RSS reader) that you can listen to each episode with.

In the most recent episode, I interviewed Joe Perez, Founder of Tastemade. If you don’t know Joe, you should. He has a long career in developing products and companies (such as Pogo, Excite@Home, Demand Media, The Daily Plate and now TasteMade) discussed much about his career choices and lessons.

Joe has worked on and and pioneered in online video for many years so if you have an interest in that category you’ll love the full interview we did. But to make it digestible for others I’ve provided a few short clips below.

We discussed several topics, but focused primarily on his background as a product manager, as well as the evolution of the production, distribution, and monetization of online video. If you read my blog regularly you know this is a topic close to my heart – so it was great to get perspective from someone running a company in the space (a company which just raised an additional $25 million).

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By now almost everybody knows that Marc Andreessen has taken Twitter by storm. By Tweetstorm, that is. Marc seems to single handedly have changed all conventions in Tweeting by dropping 7-10 rapid Tweets in a related stream-of-consciousness labeling each Tweet with a number and a slash before it.

Fred Wilson wrote a Tweetstorm and then did a blog post on the topic. I’ll address his questions at the end of this post.

While Fred’s post makes sense, I honestly think Tweetstorming isn’t Marc’s real magic on Twitter. So I’d like to weigh in with what I believe is.

Background

Marc Andreessen was a prolific and much read blogger for a brief period of time. People religiously read, shared and pontificated on his work. This was pre social media. And then out of nowhere he abruptly stopped. And from there Ben Horowitz became the amazing blogger of record at a16z. Of course they then added Chris Dixon, Ben Evans and many other great public voices.

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It’s not hard to find people willing to write the narrative that “venture capital is not an asset class” or “venture capital has performed terribly.”

The most recent was 18 months ago or so called The Kauffman Report. It had an influence on the people who fund our industry in a negative way as many asset managers who fund our industry read this flawed report. That’s a shame because many of these people missed out on what will be a few great VC vintages.

The biggest problem with the report was that it pulled together data from more than a decade ago to proclaim what the future of our industry would look like. I wrote about this in a blog post last year titled “It’s Morning in VC” but I never made the full deck available until now.

I presented the deck below – which was prepared with the great help of Upfront Venture’s Principal Jordan Hudson – at Dave McClure’s must attend event called PreMoney with much more data and narrative than I had in my blog post.

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For 2 years I interviewed VCs & founders for a show called This Week in VC. If you want to see any back interviews you can click on that link. I’ve been promising to relaunch a new show for the past 18 months but needed to find somebody to help me with cameras, filming, editing, distribution, etc. Luckily the supremely talented Kyle Taylor joined Upfront Ventures and has helped kick me in the arse to get the show going again.

We’ve already shot three episodes, which will be published soon and I have committed to doing the show on a regular basis. Feel free to add comments below on speakers you’d like to see, topics you’re interested in or formats you’d suggest for the show.

The first Bothsides TV episode is now live! I’ve created a separate Twitter handle that I’ll use to share all this content. You can subscribe to the Bothsides TV YouTube channel as well – you’ll get an email update when we post new videos.

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Startups are hard. You’ve heard that a million times. Those that we survive with become family. It’s something you can’t know unless you’ve ever been in the trenches. Working hard together at a big company just isn’t the same.

 

 

The truth is you really don’t know how your teammates or your bosses will perform in good times and bad. You hire people who look good on paper. You join teams that got good write-ups on TechCrunch, have great VCs, have star CEO’s, whatever.

After 6 months – you know. You REALLY know. Which engineers dialed it in before a big release because it was during July 4th weekend? Who came in the office at 2am when the servers crashed – even on the night of the big company party. Who was willing to jump on a plan on a Sunday morning with a hang-over to make sure they were there the night before an important biz dev pitch on a Monday morning.

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